Your name or email adress:
Do you already have an account?
Forgot your password?
  • Log in or Sign up


    Results 1 to 10 of 10

    Thread: KRS vs.Adisa

    1. #1
      Nesayem is offline Afrika Is In You

      Join Date
      May 2005
      Location
      Wandering Star
      Posts
      1,525
      Thumbs Up/Down
      Received: 0/0
      Given: 0/0
      Rep Power
      223

      KRS vs.Adisa


      0 Not allowed! Not allowed!
      Afrika Bambaataa Brokers Peace Between KRS and Adisa
      --------------------------------------------------------------------------

      Afrika Bambaataa Brokers Peace Between KRS and Adisa
      by Davey D

      Yesterday March 9th on the anniversary of what was the 9th anniversary of the tragic slaying of the Notorious BIG, a good thing happened that would hopefully send a signal to people that his and 2Pac’s death did not happen in vein. A peaceful resolution between two high profile individuals within Hip Hop who have a had a war of words for more then a year was established. This war of words escalated intoan unfortunate and ugly incident at a Conference held at Stanford University this past weekend. We’re talking about the Blastmaster KRS-One and writer Adisa Banjoko.


      The original source of their conflict is not that important. In all due respect, we should be focused on the lack of progress by our government in restoring the 9th Ward in New Orleans in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina. Can you believe there are still scores of un-recovered bodies there?

      We should be focused on the war between the garbage being spewed by commercial radio under the banner of Hip Hop. We should be concerned about all the new laws and designed to snatch our liberties by the guy who sits in the house on 1600 Pennsylvania Ave in Washington DC.But with all that being said, what took place yesterday was a beautiful thing.

      Hip Hop pioneer Afrika Bambaataa got the two men together and helped work through the conflict. During the intense conversation both men came to see that there’s a larger picture in terms of protecting Hip Hop and dealing with some very real outside enemies that are attacking the culture and our communities. Both KRS and Adisa talked like grown men with a sense of purpose and showed respect for one another as they agreed that this conflict should not have played itself in the public stage the way that it had and that it was now time for them to put all this behind them and move on to bigger things that need their attention.

      Both men also agreed that there were some hurtful things they have said to and about each other. They also owned up to some of the actions they undertaken have reflected poor judgment and could've been done differently and more importantly, more respectfully. That included the way things were handled this past weekend on Saturday at Stanford by KRS on down to the way Adisa initially challenged KRS to a debate on his philosophy. Both men also clearly understood that it's important to stand up and show the world that folks can have major disagreements and still come to a peaceful resolution while maintaining their respective view points… In other words there’s room for everyone to co-exist. They also came to the conclusion of keeping the lines of communication open.

      A big shout is in order to Afrika Bambaataa who demonstrated true leadership that was reflected yesterday in his years of handling and dealing with conflicts… His example and wisdom is one that we can all learn from and follow… Hip Hop needs that now. Big shout out to KRS and Adisa for keeping it real and seeing the greater good… I ran into KRS last night at his show in LA at the Viper Room and he was not only on fire, but feeling pretty damn good things got worked out. I spoke with Adisa who also felt good and is ready to focus his attention on other pressing issues like the current Black-Brown conflicts that seem to be plaguing certain areas of the Golden State.

    2. #2
      IfasehunReincarnated's Avatar
      IfasehunReincarnated is offline Never Let Them Disrespect the Ancestors

      Join Date
      Jan 2004
      Location
      Sirius & Onile Simultaneously
      Posts
      6,006
      Thumbs Up/Down
      Received: 11/0
      Given: 0/0
      Rep Power
      437

      0 Not allowed! Not allowed!
      I heard the altercation between Adisa and Kris and frankly Adisa is a parasite on the Hip-Hop community. He is wack, eurocentric and way too confident in his grasp of Hip-Hop or urban issues. Kris was correct when he told Adisa "you better be a thug if you intend to stand up to me."

      I have no idea why Kris would back down except to please the intellectuals, apologists, bookworms and pacifists present @ Stanford when he cut Adisa down to size. I for one say whats the point of having a way of identifying enemies of culture if you cant call them out when you see them?

      Kris sounds odd w/ the Temple of Hip-Hop thing, but aside from this everything he said that day and in other instances over the last 3 yrs about Adisa are 100% on mark.

      If you see Adisa walking around the Bay area push him in a puddle and promptly step on any copies of Lyrical Swords (or whatever his raggedy book is called) that he has on his person. We dont need any more Buppies trying to usurp Hip-Hop.

      If you havent heard the audio of their recent confrontation, get it. Its worth the listen. Especially listen the point he makes about "having a plan since '73, but the black kids keep going to college and trying to come back to the hood and reinvent the wheel"
      All is Well. Workin' Hard - Tryin' to Save Time for Fam. Check in Periodically.

    3. #3
      rebelAfrika's Avatar
      rebelAfrika is offline Pan-Africanism or Perish!

      Join Date
      Jun 2004
      Location
      Conakry, Guinea
      Posts
      5,324
      Thumbs Up/Down
      Received: 1/0
      Given: 0/0
      Rep Power
      500

      0 Not allowed! Not allowed!
      Flawed Philosophy: KRS and 'Being Hip-Hop'
      Adisa Banjoko



      Blastmaster KRS ONE,

      For the last few years I have watched you write or speak about the merits of "being Hip Hop" and alluding to some spiritual core power within Hip Hop itself. While Hip Hop does indeed command more power than any other musical art form before it, too much weight is being put on its true power and potential. I believe that your idea on "being Hip Hop" while sounding and feeling good, is in truth weak. I think it is dangerous for those who truly love Hip Hop culture authentically. Following this concept gives the illusion that Hip Hop can and should be equal to other cultures and faiths like African, Latino, Japanese, Buddhist, Judaic, Islamic, or Christian.

      The sub-culture of Hip Hop is not built to support people in the manner that one can "BE" of other dominant cultures or faiths. The richness of the contributions of other faiths and cultures to Hip Hop are what MAKE Hip Hop great. I submit that Hip Hop is a subculture. Being a sub-culture, Hip Hop is not meant to facilitate such things. It is meant to absorb things that exist already and re-frame them in a contemporary urban environment.

      To not realize this point, is to mistake the scaffolding of a building for the actual foundation. I love Hip Hop! But I will not pile cultural and spiritual bricks to its structure (especially when I KNOW it was not meant to support such weight).

      One of the more disturbing ideas proposed in your philosophy is that in order to BE "Hip Hop" one should consider giving up who they originally claimed themselves to be (African, Jewish, Irish, Japanese, Christian, Native American etc.) . However, almost everything "Hip Hop" now is something else from some other culture, that was deemed "Hip Hop" later.

      Think about it. Were Technic 1200's turntables, Adidas shelltoe shoes, and Kung Fu flicks, made with Hip Hop in mind? Or did those who claim the sub-culture of Hip Hop embrace them, thus "making" them "Hip Hop"? From this perspective, what is and is not "Hip Hop" is merely an issue of consumerism.

      Further, was the African oral tradition HIP-HOP?, The martial arts fighting system of Capoeria? The African American political ideologies of Malcolm X? Were the Black Panthers created specifically FOR "Hip Hop"? Or, were these movements and ideals MADE "Hip Hop" by the Hip Hop community?

      Imagine Hip Hop without the Black nationalistic infusions of Public Enemy and Paris? How different would Hip Hop be minus the Latin flavor of Cypress Hill and the dance movements of Pop Master Fabel? Can you imagine Hip Hop without the eastern philosophical insights from Wu-Tang Clan or Afu-Ra? What would Hip Hop be without the strong beauty of songs like Kanye's "Jesus Walks" or Talib Kewli's "The Proud"? Hip Hop has never and will never stand on its own.

      With or without Hip Hop's support, approval or understanding those technological advances, clothing lines, movements and philosophies will continue to exist.

      What is and is NOT Hip Hop is usually co-opted by those in the Hip Hop community from an outside source. Very little in Hip Hop has been "invented" by "us". However MUCH has been re-mixed and re-framed to fit the Hip Hop subculture. We must be honest about this fact if we truly wish to see our true selves. To do so does not negate the greatness of Hip Hop.

      Also, racially and culturally speaking, a friend of mine in the U.K., Kevin Sekweyama made a very salient point. "Let's say the mother is German and the father is Australian. If the kid's father is a B-boy is the kid supposed to say 'My mother is German, and my Dad is Hip Hop'?" The mere suggestion sounds ridiculous!

      KRS, I know you must see how this kind of thinking spirals toward the insane. You must acknowledge the myopic mind state you’ve suggested.

      We must not get so emotionally caught up in the moment that we mistake Hip Hop for something that it is not. The music of the civil rights era was soul, and R&B...But no one from that era says "I am soul". We must remember that the MOVEMENT was the source of the music and not the other way around.

      Further, to paraphrase Hip Hop children’s book author of "Turntable Timmy" Mike Perry. He noted that Chicano low rider culture is a major force in the community. But no one would ever say, 'I am no longer Chicano, I am a low rider'.

      After heard your statements I would like to formally challenge you, KRS ONE, to a debate on this subject in a public forum. Know that this challenge is not intended to be physical or on wax- but rather a purely philosophical one . I further assert that nothing in the so-called "Gospel of Hip Hop" will have new concepts. I submit that everything in the so-called "Gospel" will be a previously "eastern" or "western" concept framed in a Hip Hop context. Rather than do that, why not just give those who seek knowledge the real roots of the paths you expound upon (Buddhism, Rig Vedas, Taoism, Islam, Christianity, Judaism etc.)? Isn't that more honorable than masking other faiths with the veil of Hip Hop? Simply changing the context does not make it new.

      Is Hip Hop possibly the world’s greatest sub-culture? No doubt. Has it given many people a new passion for politics, their own sense of self and a new found love for spirituality? No doubt. But it's nothing for us to "be". It is for us to love, nurture, and nourish with truth as we grow. You should also know that these positions are my secondary reasons for denying the "I am Hip Hop" philosophy. I'd rather tell you the rest in person.

      KRS ONE, I would like to debate you before the end of 2004 at the Riekes Center for Human Enhancement, located in the California Bay Area. Ideally, any weekend of your choice in October 2004 would be best for me . But any month before the year’s close is fine. I propose that we each compose a team of two individuals including ourselves to present for twenty minutes each.

      I do not want this to be just about you and me. Or about you being from the east coast and me being from the westside. I am not alone in my position. There are others from all over the world that agree that the cultural and spiritual values of Hip Hop culture are being oversold in this philosophical doctrine. Teams make the debate more lively. Let's raise the bar on Hip Hop debates in a civilized manner in 2004.

      I also propose that this event not be done for money. Any proceeds from the event should go to non-profit organizations of our choosing to be stated at the time of the debate. Know that I make this challenge not out of remote malice, or ill intent. But I do this because you taught me through your records and lectures to speak the truth and think for myself. So now I wish to bring the truth to you on a subject that we both care so much about.

      I also encourage others in the Hip Hop community world- wide think about what it means to "be Hip Hop". I pray they discuss what it means to negate their ancestry, racial affiliation, spiritual base, etc., to "be Hip Hop". Let's talk about it.

      Do not shortchange yourself, and the seekers of knowledge by denying this request. If you feel confident you can defend your statements and the so-called "Gospel", respond within the next 30 days to set an actual date for the "Great Debate". If you make your points manifest, I will concede that you are correct. However, if I am able to prove my points, I ask that you concede flaws in your theory of "being Hip Hop" before the world. I look forward to hearing from you soon and having a passionate public debate in the near future.

      Peace,
      Adisa Banjoko Host of One Mic Radio




      KRS-One Responds To Debate Challenge
      KRS-One



      Adisa Banjoko,

      I truly thank you for such intellectual nourishment. I can always count on you for some real discussions on the state of our Hiphop community. You are truly a much needed architect on the scaffolds of Hiphop's cultural development. I appreciate your concerns and comments. Everyone can learn from this.


      Before I consider accepting your offer to debate the; I am Hiphop philosophy at the Riekes Center for Human Enhancement, let me be sure that you truly understand the position that you are taking, and how you may be setting yourself up for a public spanking. I am truly in awe of your blindness! It is as if someone is putting you up to this. Be honest, are these your concerns or are you simply representing the insecurities of others? As a thinking man you cannot be serious.

      I ask this because before becoming the Host of One Mic Radio you were the Bishop of Hip Hop. And I knew that you were not literally a high-ranking Christian cleric in charge of a diocese. But I did expect from you a discussion on Hiphop that transcended Rap music entertainment. And your earlier writings as the Bishop of Hip Hop suggested as such. What happened? Be careful that the environment of radio broadcasting has not confused your mind as to the principles of true Hiphop? More personally, have you stopped living Hiphop, or were you just fronting as Hiphop's bishop to get what you needed from KRS-ONE?

      Whatever happened to Chicken Soup for the Hip Hop Soul? Is this project still happening? And if so, what then is Hiphop's Soul? Not Hiphop's soul as a Muslim, or as a Christian, or as a Jew, or as a Buddhist, etc., but Hiphop's soul as Hiphop? Before we debate any other issue pertaining to Hiphop, should we not first have closure with the past issues and projects you and I both have invested our time and money into? Your whole challenge sounds like a set-up to me! One rooted in fear and ignorance, and not in truth!

      But for the protection of Adisa; my dear friend in the struggle, and for the education of all interested Hiphoppas consider this. WE ARE HIPHOP! We are not just doing Hiphop; WE ARE HIPHOP! We are the spiritual, mental and physical activity of Hiphop in the material world. And why do I say this? Because it is the truth! No other culture, ethnicity or religion
      truly cares about us. They use us and our elements to further their individual causes with little or nothing going back to the preservation and sustainment of Hiphop itself, but they themselves will not claim a Hiphop ethnicity. And why should anyone who is not Hiphop, care about Hiphop above whatever they have invested their real commitment to? We (Hiphoppas) are
      not their responsibility. We are our responsibility.

      It is up to us to take care of us. For if we are truly committed to the principles of peace, love, unity and having fun as laid down by Afrika Bambaataa in the mid 1980's, then it is us (the Hiphop nation) that must achieve such high ideals for ourselves. Such privileges as peace, love, unity and having fun are never truly given to anyone; they are achieved by those who desire them. The question for you Adisa is; are you truly free or have you been freed?

      A truly free person can decide at any moment to be anyone or anything he/she chooses to be. A freed person relies upon the definitions and interpretations of those people he/she feels inferior to for the survival, meaning and purpose of their own freed lives. A person who has been freed cannot create or even re-create themselves. They are forever defined by interest foreign to their own. Was this not also the intent of the slave trade?

      To suggest that we cannot re-create our very ethnicity today for our own human advancement and that of our children is to actually re-enslave ourselves and our children daily to interest foreign to our own. Such a suggestion is actually the cause of political
      stagnation for any group. If we lose the ability to define ourselves; who then is defining us? If we do not offer ourselves peace, who or what shall we wait
      upon for such an achievement? Who can we really depend upon for our sustained peace, love, unity and happiness? Black people? White people? Chicanos, Asians, Hindus, Christians, Jews? Who is supposed to ensure our well-being? Who are we waiting on? Is it not obvious today that people are more united by interest and like-mindedness than by race, class or
      religion? Is it not time for those who are making a living from Hiphop to finally stop using the culture and start building it?

      Adisa, if my plan for peace, love, unity and happiness is unacceptable to you, I humbly suggest that you lay out a plan of your own. Such is the character of true leadership! But to have no plan of your own yet critique and even demean the value of the plan that I lay out is exactly what those who would exploit Hiphop and its elements want from you. Free yourself! Don't be used as a miter-shaped chess piece that moves diagonally across any number of unoccupied Hiphop spaces-a bishop. In truth Adisa, you do have the authority to become whatever you have the capability to achieve. The decision is truly yours to make.

      I have decided to live my life as a citizen of Hiphop kulture. If you have not, such is your choice. I am not better than you. I do not look down upon you. In fact, through Hiphop I am better able to love you; to understand you; to empower you. Your decisions on life
      and its meaning are for you, and my life decisions are for me. Hiphop is my faith! And how can anyone debate the reality of another man's faith? Such a debate is pointless. It is faith! And isn't it true that faith makes all things possible. You speak as if you have no faith in Hiphop.

      I know that such ways of looking at the world as an attuned Hiphoppa may sound strange to many. But I am Hiphop's Teacha. My work is to help Hiphoppas understand themselves and raise up a free and prosperous Hiphop nation. In fact, through Hiphop I have personally achieved already that which I teach to others. In Hiphop I am truly free and prosperous. I
      have inner peace, I give and receive much love, the Temple of Hiphop is strong and unified, and with my wife and children I am having fun! Others may decide to live in other ways; such is their decision to make. But when thousands of people that participate in Hiphop's elements approach me for the secrets to the success Hiphop has given me, my love for them compels me to speak the truth regarding my life.

      England did not work for George Washington, James Madison or Thomas Jefferson. Babylon did not work for Abraham. Egypt did not work for Moses. Judaism did not work for Jesus. And likewise, being African-American did not and does not work for me. It may work for others, but it does not work for me. For me, it is limiting. For others it is liberating! But for me, it
      is Hiphop that is truly liberating! And if you are getting something out of being your ethnicity, race or religion, I truly wish you well. But for all those who are not satisfied with the potentials of their ethnicities, religions, careers, etc. I offer exactly what has helped me-HIPHOP!

      I am not saying that if you do not practice Hiphop in the way that I practice it that you are not Hiphop. I am not even saying that my way is the only way. What I am saying is that; we have an opportunity to re-create ourselves for the purpose of achieving true peace,
      love, unity and happiness for ourselves and for our children through Hiphop. Other art forms and sub-cultures had and continue to have the same choice. Whether they choose to take advantage of such an opportunity in their own lives, is their own business. Our decisions as Hiphoppas are not contingent upon the decisions they may or may not have made. We are truly free.

      By seeing Hiphop beyond entertainment and Rap music product we create a political, intellectual and spiritual blank tablet to which we can write our own futures upon. Is this not true freedom? Why then do you not understand this concept? Why does my faith in Hiphop disturb you so? You are free to interpret Hiphop in any way that you may decide. However, I am successful at the style of Hiphop that I present. Everything that I teach, I have successfully lived. Those who decide not to follow such teachings are free to go elsewhere. But let me be crystal clear here; I AM HIPHOP!

      Therefore, due to your lack of evidence regarding my flawed philosophy I will reject your offer for a public debate until you can more accurately prove the intent of your inquiry. If such a debate does not benefit the further development of Hiphop Kulture, I cannot waste Hiphop's time debating you publicly. My 13th album KEEP RIGHT comes out on July 13th 2004. I have real work to do. However, you and I can talk privately anytime. The struggle continues. Much love.


      The Teacha,

      KRS-ONE

    4. #4
      Tehuti-4's Avatar
      Tehuti-4 is offline Atef Warrior

      Join Date
      Oct 2004
      Location
      Azania
      Posts
      1,761
      Thumbs Up/Down
      Received: 0/1
      Given: 0/0
      Rep Power
      274

      0 Not allowed! Not allowed!
      And why do I say this? Because it is the truth! No other culture, ethnicity or religion
      truly cares about us. They use us and our elements to further their individual causes with little or nothing going back to the preservation and sustainment of Hiphop itself, but they themselves will not claim a Hiphop ethnicity.
      I don't know, I love KRS but I'm sorry this is just confusion. Maybe somebody can explain it to me.
      The most powerful weapon in the hands of the oppressor is the mind of the oppressed.

    5. #5
      IfasehunReincarnated's Avatar
      IfasehunReincarnated is offline Never Let Them Disrespect the Ancestors

      Join Date
      Jan 2004
      Location
      Sirius & Onile Simultaneously
      Posts
      6,006
      Thumbs Up/Down
      Received: 11/0
      Given: 0/0
      Rep Power
      437

      0 Not allowed! Not allowed!
      These are the articles that started the fight between Adisa and Kris but this is NOT the most recent altercation. Adisa and Kris were both on a panel Stanford University a few weeks ago and Kris flat out called Adisa a FBI agent selling, reporting, and analyzing Hip-Hop for businesses, colleges etc for pay without having every truly been a part of Hip-Hop.

      When you heard the audio from Stanford, you can put these articles by both in perspective and you see why Kris clowned him. Remember Adisa came to Kris and asked him to help him write a book before - which would have legitimized Adisa in the Hip-Hop community, because truth be told Adisa aint NOBODY in the Bay or outside of the Bay unless your day begins with college textbooks.

      He is a self appointed "intellectual" that is trying to make a living pretending to be involved in the Hip-Hop underground. And on top of that decided to INITIATE a public assessment of Kris' philosophy on Hip-Hop (however crazy it is at times) AFTER he had already used Kris' name to get some celebrity and validation.

      This would be no different than me coming to you to learn how to ride a bike then writing an article about how much better a rider I am than you and that I always secretly thought you rode like a girl. Adisa backdoored his way into the Hip-Hop community with no credentials by trying to hook up w/ Kris then tried to lamblast his ideas after he got a Kris pass into the hood. Go to his site, this negro is NOT Hip-Hop.

      Again, listen to the Stanford University audio. Adisa is bum.
      All is Well. Workin' Hard - Tryin' to Save Time for Fam. Check in Periodically.

    6. #6
      IfasehunReincarnated's Avatar
      IfasehunReincarnated is offline Never Let Them Disrespect the Ancestors

      Join Date
      Jan 2004
      Location
      Sirius & Onile Simultaneously
      Posts
      6,006
      Thumbs Up/Down
      Received: 11/0
      Given: 0/0
      Rep Power
      437

      0 Not allowed! Not allowed!
      Kris' position is that a group of black and latino kids created Hip-Hop because their own more dominant black, latino, ghetto, and american cultures abandoned them. It says Hip-Hop became pervasive and all inclusive for them. They invented a new way to talk, dress, communicate, celebrate, pray whatever..all through the elements of rap, graph, dance and some other components i dont remember.

      He says that most black and latino people were not checking for them until the music hit the dance clubs as early 70/80s mainstream. He says they were poor kids who saw and lived dangerous lives with no support from anybody. He says they formed groups like the Zulu Nation and had their own philosophy, law and rules of conduct. He says they formed their own way to make money through the artforms of their culture.

      Now me, I think some of it sounds hocky, but in general - its true. Now with that said, I dont approve any concept that says that Hip-Hop is its own culture.

      But I didnt ask Kris to bring me under his wing and be my teacher either. I didnt pop out of some pristine white college and try to get involved then. I had a cardboard box and mixtapes back in the 80s. Adisa is what we call a "county brownie" he sweet like kool-aid. He views himself as a journalist and a social commentator. but he aint never rap, he never breakdanced, he never owned a spray can.

      Whats the large picture? Kris is using Adisa to prove a point: he is tired of Rap Magazines that got more white writers and photographers that just started to listen to rap when Run-DMC's "Walk This Way" hit than blacks and latinos that listened to the music years before that. And I can feel that. Heck, I thought "Walk This Way" was wack. I never owned it, never played it, never dug it. It was the wackiest song out that year. black people just liked that white people was finally giving them some props (Apparently, its Hard being a Pimp for white people now)

      Adisa is trying to get into Hip-Hop like the white kids, with a tape recorder, a notebook and a publishing deal.
      All is Well. Workin' Hard - Tryin' to Save Time for Fam. Check in Periodically.

    7. #7
      Tehuti-4's Avatar
      Tehuti-4 is offline Atef Warrior

      Join Date
      Oct 2004
      Location
      Azania
      Posts
      1,761
      Thumbs Up/Down
      Received: 0/1
      Given: 0/0
      Rep Power
      274

      0 Not allowed! Not allowed!
      Quote Originally Posted by IfasehunReincarnated
      Kris' position is that a group of black and latino kids created Hip-Hop because their own more dominant black, latino, ghetto, and american cultures abandoned them. It says Hip-Hop became pervasive and all inclusive for them. They invented a new way to talk, dress, communicate, celebrate, pray whatever..all through the elements of rap, graph, dance and some other components i dont remember.

      He says that most black and latino people were not checking for them until the music hit the dance clubs as early 70/80s mainstream. He says they were poor kids who saw and lived dangerous lives with no support from anybody. He says they formed groups like the Zulu Nation and had their own philosophy, law and rules of conduct. He says they formed their own way to make money through the artforms of their culture.

      Now me, I think some of it sounds hocky, but in general - its true. Now with that said, I dont approve any concept that says that Hip-Hop is its own culture.

      But I didnt ask Kris to bring me under his wing and be my teacher either. I didnt pop out of some pristine white college and try to get involved then. I had a cardboard box and mixtapes back in the 80s. Adisa is what we call a "county brownie" he sweet like kool-aid. He views himself as a journalist and a social commentator. but he aint never rap, he never breakdanced, he never owned a spray can.

      Whats the large picture? Kris is using Adisa to prove a point: he is tired of Rap Magazines that got more white writers and photographers that just started to listen to rap when Run-DMC's "Walk This Way" hit than blacks and latinos that listened to the music years before that. And I can feel that. Heck, I thought "Walk This Way" was wack. I never owned it, never played it, never dug it. It was the wackiest song out that year. black people just liked that white people was finally giving them some props (Apparently, its Hard being a Pimp for white people now)

      Adisa is trying to get into Hip-Hop like the white kids, with a tape recorder, a notebook and a publishing deal.

      Tua for that explanation Ifasahun,

      It clarifies a lot. I just get uneasy when I hear talk of "hip-hop ethnicity", "hip hop culture" and so on. I remember this debate going on sometime ago and J. Kunjufu writing a book about it called Hip-Hop or Ma'at.

      Anyway again tua for shedding light on this for my person.

      Tehuti4
      The most powerful weapon in the hands of the oppressor is the mind of the oppressed.

    8. #8
      G.O.D.F.A.T.H.A.'s Avatar
      G.O.D.F.A.T.H.A. is offline Universal Wisdom Seeker

      Join Date
      Mar 2004
      Location
      The Afrikan Planet
      Posts
      2,430
      Blog Entries
      9
      Thumbs Up/Down
      Received: 12/1
      Given: 6/0
      Rep Power
      304

      0 Not allowed! Not allowed!
      This is a silly debate if you ask me. I emailed Adisa before on this issue that he has with KRS 1 and he told me to back off or else he would challenge me to a debate. Imagine him challenging me to a debate. I would crush him in every which way.





    9. #9
      Erzulie Danto's Avatar
      Erzulie Danto is offline justice for Ayiti!!!

      Join Date
      Feb 2005
      Location
      indigo wanderer
      Posts
      384
      Thumbs Up/Down
      Received: 0/0
      Given: 0/0
      Rep Power
      132

      peace family


      0 Not allowed! Not allowed!
      i'm not familiar with this Adisa character, and given the insights offered nor do i care to be.

      still, KRS-One, was a great voice in inspiring my early Black consciousness. so i continue to honor his (early) contributions.

      nonetheless, i've been dismayed with his hyper-multiculturalizing of hiphop culture. back when i used be involved in producing hiphop events, i met far too many privledged yt and non-Afrikan peoples wanting to take charge and be the hiphop experts and time and time again they were validated and worked within KRS's Temple of HipHop. Professor Griff also commented in an interview that Temple of HipHop as an organization is not dealing with or speaking to the youth in Black communities (this powerful interview is posted here on this forum). it could be said that the organization is made up mostly of white backpackers. so then what is a HipHop ethnicity? who is benefiting from this language?

      anyway i found this on Temple of Hiphop website, this is from an article by KRS-One:

      "No where else on earth is there an international culture that is home to all races, classes, ethnicities and religious beliefs other than Hip Hop. No where else on earth is a person truly judged by the “content of their character” rather than by the “color of their skin” than within Hip Hop. Dr. King said, “ One day on red hills of Georgia, sons of former slaves and sons of former slave owners will be able to sit down together at the table of brotherhood”. Nowhere has this happened in the world on a mainstream level except within the community of Hip Hop. As pimped-out, thugged-out and drugged-out as we appear to be, Hip Hop is NOT a racist culture. Our existence as a Hip Hop community fulfills Dr. King’s prophecy philosophically and historically.Within our Hip Hop community a person gains money, power and respect through a display of high skill in one or more of Hip Hop’s unique elements. Here, you are truly judged by the content of your character (your attributes, your abilities, your reputation, who you associate with) not by your race or ethnic origin. Hip Hop is beyond all that."

      http://www.templeofhiphop.org/the_promised_land.html

      what do you all think?
      justice for Ayiti!!!

    10. #10
      IfasehunReincarnated's Avatar
      IfasehunReincarnated is offline Never Let Them Disrespect the Ancestors

      Join Date
      Jan 2004
      Location
      Sirius & Onile Simultaneously
      Posts
      6,006
      Thumbs Up/Down
      Received: 11/0
      Given: 0/0
      Rep Power
      437

      0 Not allowed! Not allowed!
      Erzulie Danto certainly this is where things get "hocky" as I said earlier. I dont support anything that calls itself culture that doesnt have elders. Hip-Hop has no elders. Just "older people" walking around in fitted caps with sagging pants. I also dont prescribe to the idea that we need anything to bring together races except for white people to stop harassing people to give up their culture. Native Americans, Afrikans, Asians etc. we were already united. White people have the problem 99.999999% of the time.

      But I can't front several Kris cuts actually saved my life

      Loves' Gonna Get Ya - this song shaped my ENTIRE outlook on materialism and how I use the word love.

      Breathe Control - this song made me dig deeper into my meditation practice.

      Stop the Violence - i was considering selling drugs for the first time when this song came out.

      My Philosophy - this song made me considering going vegetarian.

      You Must Learn - i started organizing other teens based on this song and purely on this song. weekly meetings of 30-50 kids at my house for 1.5 years and conferences with over 100 in attendence all engineered by kids. some of us didnt even have driver's licenses yet.

      The "Temple of Hip-Hop" and "H.E.A.L." were (are) digressions to me. But I understand how HE could arrive at those paths. He has grown progressively discontent with the lack of critical thinkers and committed hip-hoppers. He has a growing need to talk to colleges, but he also has a growing hatred for what higher education does to kids. He human.

      But what you can't do is go hang out with him, use him and then betray him. Adisa is lucky Kris hasnt figured out that a good way to jumpstart some radio spins would be to release a diss record on this little pinstrip suit wearing gremlin. lol
      All is Well. Workin' Hard - Tryin' to Save Time for Fam. Check in Periodically.

    Thread Information

    Users Browsing this Thread

    There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

    Similar Threads

    1. Adisa vs. KRS-1 "Being Hip-Hop"
      By IfasehunReincarnated in forum Conscious Music - Artists - News And Views
      Replies: 3
      Last Post: 06-22-2005, 03:46 PM

    Thread Participants: 5

    Posting Permissions

    • You may not post new threads
    • You may not post replies
    • You may not post attachments
    • You may not edit your posts
    •  


    About

      Assata Shakur Speaks is an Forum Devoted To Assata Shakur And All Political Prisoners Around The World.
      Assata Shakur Speaks Is An Oasis Of Pan African Information Geared Towards The Liberation Of Afrikan People.

    Follow Us On

    Twitter Facebook youtube Flickr DavianArt Dribbble RSS Feed



    BACK TO TOP