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    View Poll Results: Will the Hip-Hop Generation ever grow up?

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    19. You may not vote on this poll
    • Yes

      4 21.05%
    • No

      9 47.37%
    • They dont have to.

      1 5.26%
    • Other

      5 26.32%
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    1. #1
      Kimani's Avatar
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      "Growing Old": Will the Hip-Hop Generation ever grow up? Do we have to?


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      "Fat titties turn to teardrops as fat ass turns to flab
      Sores that was open wounds eventually turn to scab
      Trees bright and green turn yellow brown
      Autumn caught em, see all them leaves must fall down, growin old"
      (repeat 3X)--Outkast, ATLiens:"Growing Old" (1996)

      what was this youngbwoy thinking?: did he even realize the gravity of his comments?: i'm sitting on my porch the other nite with one of my bwoys and some little knuckle-head youngbwoy nods at us and says somewhat endearingly: "whats up ole-heads?"; i'm thinking bwoooy ill beat your little azz; i can probably out dance you, out dress you, and out Mack you: little punk!; then it hit us both, we are gettin older; i'm 33, my bwoy 32, and we are a-part of a generation that does not really know how to grow-up; on some levels, the Hip-Hop generation doesnt feel it has to;

      i mean, lets keep it real: Hip-Hop culture belongs to the Hip-Hop generation; most of the fashion, music, style, language, technologies these youngguns celebrate...we started, and popularized this shyt!: shaggy pants, fitteds, cell-phones, video games, "360s" (all around deep waves); "throw-backs"; we were the first to play video games and use cell phones; we took baggy, used, clothes to a whole-notha level; basketball shoes; Jordans; big Tees; again, this is all our shyt; lets not even mention music and dance; Hip-Hop, Rap, we hold the patent to its popularity; Chicago Footworkers; New Orleans "Pussy-Popping"; "Jackin" and "Juking"; "Break Dancing"; this, and much much more of Hip-Hop is all ours: The Hip-Hop Generation; the younguns have laid claim to our culture and identity; they wont let us grow-older in peace and comfort and without a fight;

      Jay-Z in suits; Kanye going prep-ie; Master P still in his jersey, fitteds, and baggy jeans; grown-azz women in "Baby-Phat" shirts, skirts, and jeans; these men and women represent a Generation struggling to find its "grown-up" identity; will the Hip-Hop Generation ever grow-up?; do we have to? what the hell would this look like?: old-azz men in baggy jeans, listening to gangsta rap music, and playing PlayStation?; old women in Rocawear pajamas?; what a sight it would/will be? that young-bwoy didnt know the half of what he was saying to us last night; maybe he did?; maybe something in his sub-consciousness was telling us to grow-up; to be the Men/Women his generations wants to look up to, that they want to immulate; but when they look they only see equally as immature reflections of themselves. Uhuru!
      "The problem with modern conceptualizations is it leaves no room for other sources of knowledge...The Kemetic concept approaches the process of knowing from a more 'common sense' approach. Ultimately knowing is the result of a divine, universal, and intergenerational conversation among God the creator, the cosmos, nature and the creatures of the earth, especially human beings...the process of human creativity is an imitation or rather repitition of divine creativity."--Jacob Carruthers

    2. #2
      G.O.D.F.A.T.H.A.'s Avatar
      G.O.D.F.A.T.H.A. is offline Universal Wisdom Seeker

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      Yea I agree that PopRap is damaging the minds of the youth. HipHop in the mean while is going strong and educating them. HipHop = Dead Prez, Black Market Militia, Goodie Mob, Immortal Technique. Pop Rap= BET, local radio stastions. Uhuru!

    3. #3

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      Arrow Pop Culture Vs Tru Hip Hop!


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      when we think of hip hop, names that comes to my mind is bdk,sistah souljah,
      with 360 degree of power and x clan,professor griff,the comercialized hip hop becamea sign of pop culture and counter culture and counter revolutionary,
      gill scott heron,a towering afrikan mind in amerika as well as the last poets
      with niggers are scared of revolution,we have jay the bitch z and his artificial hoe beyonce and worse yet,little kim the massas whorez,all dem counter cultural and they are like cancer spreading fast, froma benign cancer to malign cancer,spreading thru the head and contaminating the minds of already lost youth,who dies by the gunz and live by the guns



      sotito! sododo! soora masika!
      " perform truth,perform righteousness,perform kindness and avoid cruelty!"

      Nipa nye abe dua na ne ho ahyia ne ho. Or, Se mmerenkensono si ne ti ase a, na ewo dea asase reka kyere no. Also, Nnua nyinaa bewu agya abe.

    4. #4

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      Peace!

      Re-birth, re-generation, continuity of identity, cultural expression, affinity, affection, cohesiveness.

      These are but a few words that come to mind in thinking about this question.

      As a child growing up in the 70s (I'm 35), I remember being dressed as a "mini-me" of the men in my family -Afro and all, INCLUDING that hot-**s blow-out whatchamacallit. Ears are tingling as I think about it. I even has a Dashiki, it was fiyah!

      Hip-hop is an extension and evolution of the Afrikan experience in Amerikkka. Afrikans adorn (dress as fly as we wanna be, how we wanna be) themselves. It is a cultural expression, 'aint nothing we can do about it. This is cultural DNA, (you oughtta see the Afrikans ova' here in Kemet gettin' jiggy with the fashion!!) I AM NOT speaking about Arabs -Black Afrikans, they're like whoa!

      Side note: I consistently see Afrikan women jeweled-up, and it "clicked" for me one-day that Afrikan sistas in the U.S. (and some brothers) who wear a lot of jewelry are "keeping it real" maintaing a cultural expression of Afrikanness, perhaps subconsciously.

      We who are considered "old-heads" who still "bust-out" the gear of our youth IMHO are revelling in the identity that was forged in our environment and culture.

      There are definately some things that "grown folk" should NOT be wearing, I would not necessarily equate one's attire with mind-set -appearances can and are deceiving.

      Embrace (your) Hip-Hop Senior-Citizenship!! Maturity of mind will eminate beyond physical appearances, I tend to think.

      More-so than dress, I think the danger in the transition is attempting to remain in the "mentality" of youth-culture. "Growing-up" is a subjective notion, how about "evolve?" OK, so that term may not any less subjective, but it may provide some additional lattitude for "us" to find our way and stay connected to our "first love."

      So much of Afrikan life is in transition, there will be a fusion or forking of the Hip-Hop experience and expression -it/we will evolve. Though we may not recognize the visible signs right-away, we must train our senses.

      I perceive that the re-birth, re-volution, elevation of Consciousness, particular New Afrikan, tradtional Afrikan, what have you, will infuse Hip-Hop growing forward to bring the cultural expression full-circle and spiral upwards.

      Whether willingly or not, we exist as the example, the goal is to take ownership of and responsibility for the "default" position. As we know, all who come in the name of Hip-Hop does not represent it.

      IMHO, we of the Hip-Hop generation who are maturing, and evolving who cannot identify suitable models to pattern ourselves after can take the best of Afrikan, Hip-Hop culture and our personal life lessons/expreinces/aspirations forward in blazing a trail or building a bridge.

      "Rock Da' Bells!!"

    5. #5

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      It has been my experience that one is influenced by their surroundings. At the rate the Black community is going ( I'm referring to teenage pregnancies) I'd have to say no, they'll never grow up. These young brothas and sistas are bringing life when they haven't even experienced life yet! They have such a detached sense of reality it's a shame.

      The only hope for the hip-hop community is to expose them to their "True Identity". Make them see who they really are, Afrikans, and encourage them to be proud of their heritage. Teach them who to idolize and not to idolize. Teach them that everything yt tells them is not true. Teach them that to be Black/Afrikan does not mean to be ignorant, ghetto, poor, ugly, etc.

      Surround the hip-hop community with this positivity and we can't go wrong.
      We are not citizens of amerikkka. We are victims of amerikkka.

    6. #6

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      Thumbs up word up revolutionary student and creators college


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      @ creator i will be 39 man soon be man, we are from the same generation lol,i rememba afrikan brazilians, back in da days,breaking dancing and stuff, anda lotta good stuff came out of the RIO and SAO PAULO shanty towns,PE NUMBA ONE,spoke in brazil,yeye,the one and only chuck d( glad flava didnt go yall lmaooo),yo creator,this afrikan ova here is getting old man,next year i will hit the big 40 man creator and revolutionary student :blackicon * try massala chai*



      sotito! sododo! soora masika!
      " perform truth,perform righteousness,perform kindness and avoid cruelty!"

      Nipa nye abe dua na ne ho ahyia ne ho. Or, Se mmerenkensono si ne ti ase a, na ewo dea asase reka kyere no. Also, Nnua nyinaa bewu agya abe.

    7. #7
      Nia Maishani's Avatar
      Nia Maishani is offline 1 in a Billion Twin-Soul

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      ...and ya don't stop...


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      ...rockin' to da bang, bang boogie & up jumps the boogie...

      Now this thread is PEACE. Funny, I was just pondering this same question just Monday night, and didn't even know this thread existed until today. My contemplations however are from just a bit of a different angle.

      Don't mean to be all over the place with my response, but lots of things came to mind in reading over the posts in this thread. When I look at the 30-something-year-olds I know (myself included), who really are the True Hip Hop generation (not Lil Kim or really anyone born after say 1980 or of the gangsta ilk), what I see today is that we have all EVOLVED (to use CreatorsCollege's point) in our own unique ways, and most of us I think are conscious and mature. It's kind of difficult for anyone who grew up on PE, PRT, BDP, DP, EPMD, X-Clan, etc. to have fallen off--or been developmentally delayed--though some have.

      I am arriving at a point, bear with me plz. What I see happened is that rap music was spawned by the Hip Hop generation in the late '70s-early '80's, but is not Hip Hop itself (which is the generation/culture that is much more than just the music), though it was (and in some cases still is) Hip Hop music. Rap became such a powerful genre for artistic expression, in such a short time, that it caught on across the nation, and also across the seas. But its birth was on the American East Coast, where it has since struggled to remain pure.

      Around 1989, rap--aka Hip Hop music--was laid claim to, and branched off into its Gangsta version. Presenting NWA. Gheto Boys. Willie D. Ice T. Too Short. Et al. Completely different word, sound and power from Milk & Gizmo, Roxanne Shante, Run-DMC, LL Cool J, Eric B & Rakim or Big Daddy Kane. So we now have Hip Hop Rap and Gangsta Rap, later giving way to "dirty south," "bad boy," "cash money" rap, etc. None of the latter is Hip Hop music, so I'm not sure why everyone insists on tarnishing the image of Hip Hop with muddled definitions.

      At any rate, I am getting to a point here. I chose "Other," because I don't think most Generation Hip Hop-pers are having trouble growing up. Those who stayed the course of real Hip Hop show no evident signs of a lack of maturity from where I sit. If you look at just about any Hip Hop artist (musical & otherwise) from back in the day, they've evolved and matured, and aren't into foolishness. This includes not only the MCs & DJs, but the breakers and the bombers (don't forget about them).

      Perhaps those from those other branches of the tree are having trouble growing up, however. And I do see a lot of folk who should be acting adults failing to do so. This includes a lot of rappers, but also a lot of parents. A lot of parents listen to 50 cents & Chingy & Jay Z along WITH their children. And enjoy it. And neglect to critique it. (Great points, Revolutionary Student!) A lot of parents are not being good, adult parents when they blast their music, especially around their children, and especially when the lyrics are speaking of being in love with strippers or having a rough time being a pimp, or shaking the laffy taffy, etc. Stupidity. Mentacide.

      Lastly, just one more comment, and I'll be quiet. I still listen to Hip Hop music (which includes my favorite--Spoken Word), and I will continue to do so as long as Hip Hop "Seniors" continue to produce meaningful material. But I do think that there is a lack of maturity and growth evident in lyrics which use profanity gratuitously, and which make crude references to sex and the female anatomy. I would think that once a person has matured/evolved, the sacredness of sexuality and the body temple becomes evident and respected much more. A number of Hip Hop rappers even are guilty. So yes, in a few--but not all instances, a little growing up is in order.
      Resident
      Blackalicious
      Guedebuster

      Nia Maishani
      SmJ

      "Walk like you're chosen." ~Grand Verbalizer

    8. #8

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      Thinkin' of a master plan...


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      Quote Originally Posted by Nia Maishani
      ...rockin' to da bang, bang boogie & up jumps the boogie...

      Now this thread is PEACE. Funny, I was just pondering this same question just Monday night, and didn't even know this thread existed until today. My contemplations however are from just a bit of a different angle.

      Don't mean to be all over the place with my response, but lots of things came to mind in reading over the posts in this thread. When I look at the 30-something-year-olds I know (myself included), who really are the True Hip Hop generation (not Lil Kim or really anyone born after say 1980 or of the gangsta ilk), what I see today is that we have all EVOLVED (to use CreatorsCollege's point) in our own unique ways, and most of us I think are conscious and mature. It's kind of difficult for anyone who grew up on PE, PRT, BDP, DP, EPMD, X-Clan, etc. to have fallen off--or been developmentally delayed--though some have.

      I am arriving at a point, bear with me plz. What I see happened is that rap music was spawned by the Hip Hop generation in the late '70s-early '80's, but is not Hip Hop itself (which is the generation/culture that is much more than just the music), though it was (and in some cases still is) Hip Hop music. Rap became such a powerful genre for artistic expression, in such a short time, that it caught on across the nation, and also across the seas. But its birth was on the American East Coast, where it has since struggled to remain pure.

      Around 1989, rap--aka Hip Hop music--was laid claim to, and branched off into its Gangsta version. Presenting NWA. Gheto Boys. Willie D. Ice T. Too Short. Et al. Completely different word, sound and power from Milk & Gizmo, Roxanne Shante, Run-DMC, LL Cool J, Eric B & Rakim or Big Daddy Kane. So we now have Hip Hop Rap and Gangsta Rap, later giving way to "dirty south," "bad boy," "cash money" rap, etc. None of the latter is Hip Hop, so I'm not sure why everyone insists on tarnishing the image of Hip Hop with muddled definitions.

      At any rate, I am getting to a point here. I chose "Other," because I don't think most Generation Hip Hop-pers are having trouble growing up. Those who stayed the course of real Hip Hop show no evident signs of a lack of maturity from where I sit. If you look at just about any Hip Hop artist (musical & otherwise) from back in the day, they've evolved and matured, and aren't into foolishness. This includes not only the rappers, but the breakers and the bombers (don't forget about them).

      Perhaps those from those other branches of the tree are having trouble growing up, however. And I do see a lot of folk who should be acting adults failing to do so. This includes a lot of rappers, but also a lot of parents. A lot of parents listen to 50 cents & Chingy & Jay Z along WITH their children. And enjoy it. And neglect to critique it. (Great points, Revolutionary Student!) A lot of parents are not being good, adult parents when they blast their music, especially around their children, and especially when the lyrics are speaking of being in love with strippers or having a rough time being a pimp, or shaking the laffy taffy, etc. Stupidity. Mentacide.

      Lastly, just one more comment, and I'll be quiet. I still listen to Hip Hop music (which includes my favorite--Spoken Word), and I will continue to do so as long as Hip Hop "Seniors" continue to produce meaningful material. But I do think that there is a lack of maturity and growth evident in lyrics which use profanity gratuitously, and which make crude references to sex and the female anatomy. I would think that once a person has matured/evolved, the sacredness of sexuality and the body temple becomes evident and respected much more. A number of Hip Hop rappers even are guilty. So yes, in a few--but not all instances, a little growing up is in order.
      My latest blog entry goes deeper into this subject. Click the "Free Your Mind" link on my signature.

      Uhuru!
      We are not citizens of amerikkka. We are victims of amerikkka.

    9. #9
      Kimani's Avatar
      Kimani is offline Warrior

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      Still, we, will survive...No matter what, my people just stay alive;
      Still, we, will survive...No matter what, my people just stay alive...

      and yet somehow "PopRap": the "underclass": the "undeserving": continue to Create and Survive in spite of themselves, and in the spirit of their Afrikan ancestors: "they keep thining the soup and We keep coming up with chicken fiacee"!; i hope this is not class-chavinism, elitism, i am sensing here?; i just voted Yes, the Hip-Hop Generation and their abandoned, "bastard children" ("PopRap") will both grow-up and evolve, together; its inevitable; something like a cup of lentil soup and a piece of chicken. Uhuru!

    10. #10
      Draptomania's Avatar
      Draptomania is offline Warrior

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      *hits pause on Xbox to respond to post*

      Yeah, this has crossed my mind a few times...others have asked me when I was going to grow up...I think I am grown, so what I like to watch cartoons and play a lil PS2 or Xbox, so what I like to groove to a lil Eric B and Rakim, so what if I like to listen to Rock the Bells and do the cabbage patch? Yeah I still play hopscotch, jump rope and jacks, all that stuff...I say I'm doing it for my seeds, but the nostalgia, OH the NOSTALGIA




      ~Insert profound statement here~

    11. #11

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      Quote Originally Posted by Draptomania
      *hits pause on Xbox to respond to post*

      Yeah, this has crossed my mind a few times...others have asked me when I was going to grow up...I think I am grown, so what I like to watch cartoons and play a lil PS2 or Xbox, so what I like to groove to a lil Eric B and Rakim, so what if I like to listen to Rock the Bells and do the cabbage patch? Yeah I still play hopscotch, jump rope and jacks, all that stuff...I say I'm doing it for my seeds, but the nostalgia, OH the NOSTALGIA




      Blackcellent response! I'm the same way, minus the jump rope, jacks, and hop scotch. LOL!).
      We are not citizens of amerikkka. We are victims of amerikkka.

    12. #12
      lotus's Avatar
      lotus is offline Warrior

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      Generations Do Get Old


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      This is deep. Check this out. I have given this topic deep query. I do not understand how people born in 1993 on up can categorize themselves in the Hip-Hop "generation." I can understand if they categorize themselves in the Hip-Hop "culture." I ask you, will your children and their children also be categorized in the Hip-Hop "generation." I ask, can the children of today and those born tomorrow be categorized in a the "baby boomer generation" or "generation X"? NO WAY!!! Generations get old and die; but cultures can live on. We must get the terminology straight!

      Not only am I of the Hip-Hop Generation--born in the sixties, but I embrace parts of the hip-hop culture. And because I was born in the sixties, and not the thirties and forties, I am not of the baby boomer generation.
      I'm like OMG

      lotus

    13. #13
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      SoularFlarez is offline Her-Em-Akhet

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      on a stricly MUSICAL level.....

      why SHOULDNT more mature content be accepted.... the OG's/ELDERS have a voice that needs to be heard as well...... theres a market for EVERYONE ya digg ??

      but also........ more mature content needs to be put out there.... if you in ya 30s still spittin bout lookin fly, gettin high/drunk, getten into beefs, than damn..... u dont wanna live long, dont wanna live OUTside the box (concrete vacation) or just didnt mature much...............

      why cant we have songs/albums about parenthood and shyt like that cuz its real life issues we all deal with.... aint nobody partyin everyday, clubbin everyday, bussin they gun n being super gangsters they whole life.......hiphop.....pardon me RAP is too hollywood nowdays.....too much fantasy and unrealistic........ its not the same poetic stuff as before....

      it could ALSO be used to reach alot of people who dont have that well-tempered guidance from Elders being shared with them U feel me......

    14. #14
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      Hopefully it will grow up soon, being that we are up next to take the leadership role. Other than that I'm not going to put the faith in a rapper. I have faith in the brothers and sisters on this site and the ones that I march and build with to hold it down.
      "You think if there really is a God, he would agree with the man that shot Joanne Chesimard(F*** Naw) You listen what I learn to tell, I got a prophecy them crackers that framed Herman Bell gonna burn in Hell.". Saigon

    15. #15
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      "....maybe something in his sub-consciousness was telling us to grow-up; to be the Men/Women his generations wants to look up to, that they want to immulate; but when they look they only see equally as immature reflections of themselves....."


      Amen to THAT! Nothing is worse that seeing a woman/man in his mid to late 30's in the club or acting/talking/dressing like they're under 25. I pray to the holy heavens that person isn't me one day! How embarrassing....

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