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    Thread: Latin Hip-hop

    1. #1
      Jahness's Avatar
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      Latin Hip-hop

      Daddy Yankee is the kingpin of the newest phenomenon in American
      hip-hop—reggaeton. How this music from the streets is taking the
      Americas by storm.


      WEB EXCLUSIVE
      By Lorraine Ali
      Newsweek
      Updated: 8:51 a.m. ET May 20, 2005


      May 20 - Forget about those salsa lessons you’ve been meaning to take
      since J. Lo first shimmied her way onto MTV. And if you’re still
      waiting
      for that hyped “Latin invasion,” when rock en espanol bands finally hit
      it off with guitar loving rockers here in the States, don’t hold your
      breath. The newest and most promising export from Latin America is
      reggaeton (pronounced reggae-tone). And fortunately, you don’t have to
      take dance lessons or grit your teeth through cheesy approximations of
      American rock to partake.

      Reggaeton is a mix of salsa, hip-hop and dancehall with rapid fire MC’s
      dropping freestyle lyrics about urban and club life in Spanish. It
      started in the ghettos of Puerto Rico in the early ‘90s when street
      kids
      cobbled together the disparate forms of music around them and rapped
      about life in the ‘hood. The pumping beats made their way outside the
      projects via amateur mix tapes, and began circulating through Puerto
      Rico and then the Dominican Republic. It took almost a decade for the
      music to seep up from the underground and infiltrate the rest of Latin
      America, as well as the U.S. Latin world. Now, reggaeton is not only
      the
      hottest style of music among young Hispanics worldwide, it’s the newest
      phenomenon to hit American hip-hop. Julio Voltio, El Bambino and, of
      course, Daddy Yankee, are just about the coolest names you can drop in
      a club these days.

      Daddy Yankee is reggaeton’s kingpin (its 50 Cent) and he rules the
      music
      charts from Bogotá to the Bronx. The 28-year-old Puerto Rican, a.k.a.
      Raymond Ayala, is the first reggaeton artist to break big in America.
      His last album, “Barrio Fino,” put him in Billboard’s Top 40 and has
      kept him in the No. 1 spot on the Latin music charts for 40 weeks. It
      also piqued the interest of American hip-hop artists like Nas, who
      collaborated with Yankee on “The Profecy,” and Lil Jon, who
      collaborated
      with Yankee on “Gasolina”—making the reggaeton star a hot
      commodity in rap circles.

      “A few years ago, people wanted to know what reggaeton was about—is it
      just a fad?” says Yankee from his home in Puerto Rico. “But I was
      always
      confident in my genre. I knew it was gong to hit the market sooner or
      later—I just had to be patient and perseverant. Now, it’s a huge
      movement, a force to be reckoned with.”

      Reggaeton’s rise from the ghetto to the mainstream is almost a
      blow-by-blow re-creation of American rap’s rise from the projects to
      MTV
      in the ‘80s. “I always compare reggaeton with hip-hop,” says Yankee,
      “because reggaeton artists represent the people from the ‘hood—those
      who
      struggle in life. In the early ‘90s, [some people in the Puerto Rican]
      government didn’t understand us. They said the music was too violent
      and
      sexual for kids.” Some state officials denounced reggaeton lyrics and
      music videos as being derogatory toward women, and the media picked up
      the story. “It was great because it gave us lots of publicity, and I
      think that’s when everyone else started discovering reggaeton,” Yankee
      believes. The furor died down as reggaeton became more popular.

      Most reggaeton artists say they didn’t have to water down their edgy
      music in order to gain a broader appeal. But over the years some of the
      lyrics have gone from X-rated to R, or even PG-13. “I still feel like
      reggaeton is underground,” says Yankee. “We weren’t looking toward the
      mainstream, the mainstream came to us.”

      Now that these reggaeton artists are making hits and money, U.S. and
      Latin American record companies are clamoring to sign them. But Daddy
      Yankee and many of his peers are learning to become more business
      savvy.

      Yankee started out on his own label, El Cartel Records, because no one
      else would represent him. Now, he’s turned the label into a major force
      that not only encompasses his work but also the music of up-and-coming
      talents like Tommy Viera. “Their getting smarter about the music
      business,” says Yankee’s U.S. publicist, Mayna Nevarez. “They used to
      release three or four singles at a time; now they’ll release one every
      few months—just like mainstream artists.”

      The spread of the genre throughout Latin America is rare because each
      individual country and region have drastically different tastes—whether
      it’s salsa in the Dominican Republic or norteno in Mexico. “We’re using
      so many influences in the music,” says Yankee. “Music from Colombia,
      the
      Dominican Republic, Mexico. There’s so many styles in there that
      everyone feels they have a stake in reggaeton.”

      Daddy Yankee is poised to break as big as Sean Paul, the dancehall
      artist from Jamaica who crossed over into American pop by collaborating
      with artists like Beyonce and Jay-Z. Yankee is looking at another
      collaboration with Lil Jon and even a possible song or two with Dr. Dre
      for his next album, out in early 2006. “Sean Paul represented the
      dancehall movement, and that’s the street music of Jamaica,” says
      Yankee. “Hip-hop is the street music of America, as is reggaeton in
      Puerto Rico. That’s why all these different artists from different
      genres respect each other—because we are all from the street. It’s all
      an urban music, and reggaeton is the next wave. ”


      © 2005 Newsweek, Inc.
      © 2005 MSNBC.com
      URL:
      Posted In The Spirit of Learning & Sharing
      One Love & Respect Always

      ***************************************
      The Quest for knowledge stops at the grave.
      HIM Emperor Haile Selassie I.


      If you fail to prepare,
      you are preparing to fail!


      Mind what you want, because someone wants your mind.

      Working together, the ants ate the elephant.


    2. #2
      Learn06's Avatar
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      love of music


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      might buy the cd...

      06

    3. #3
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      ooooh no! I hate those songs... see my tv doesnt even works too well and I aint got no radio and I dont go to the club.. still the song keeps runnin thru my head "a ella le gusta la gasoliiiinaaa" ("she likes gasoline" wtf??) , no, no, no... and the video is even worse than 50cent videos... half (n not so half) nude girls shakin their asses around... well, u can imagin... all the songs sound the same and got the same nasty stupid lyrics and the same nasty videos.

      I respect reggaeton, but I cant support dudes like Daddy Yankee and their easy sold music.

      u know what I mean

      I would recommend artists like Kafu Banton or El Roockie (both from Panama)

      Elisa Marvena Nyarai




      SANKOFA Asociacin Cultural
      www.myspace.com/sankofacultura
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    4. #4
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      Quote Originally Posted by Elisa_Keisha
      ooooh no! I hate those songs... see my tv doesnt even works too well and I aint got no radio and I dont go to the club.. still the song keeps runnin thru my head "a ella le gusta la gasoliiiinaaa" ("she likes gasoline" wtf??) , no, no, no... and the video is even worse than 50cent videos... half (n not so half) nude girls shakin their asses around... well, u can imagin... all the songs sound the same and got the same nasty stupid lyrics and the same nasty videos.

      I respect reggaeton, but I cant support dudes like Daddy Yankee and their easy sold music.

      u know what I mean

      I would recommend artists like Kafu Banton or El Roockie (both from Panama)
      Greetings, Sister Elisa!

      Over here in Houston, Texas, they have a radio station in which they play mostly reggaeton. I remember the first time I heard a "reggaeton" song. It was interesting, because the beat ws the EXACT same beat from an Elephant Man song. It was that Nina Sky song called "Move Your Body" or something like that. And then I heard the SAME beat from the Elephant Man song used in ANOTHER reggaeton song. The song called (excuse my language) "Culo" by Pitbull which had Lil' Jon on the track. The beat that a LOT of these reggaeton songs use is SO simple. The underlying drum pattern is used throughout the genre, with some changes here and there. I kind of view reggaeton the same way that I view "crunk music".

      Now when I think of "Latin hip-hop", I'm thinking about artists like Immortal Technique, Zack De La Rocha, and Orishas.

      There is this other cat named "Chingo Bling", and well...you'll have to see for yourself. He calls himself the "Tamale Kingpin", and he actually does sell tamales. Chingo Bling

      I checked out Kafu Banton and El Rookie, and they are on point! $)

      and :cheers:
      Pyrrhic Victory (New songs are up!): http://www.reverbnation.com/pyrrhicvictory

      Some people take themselves WAY TOO SERIOUSLY, when in actuality, no one else is really taking them as seriously as they think.

    5. #5
      rebelAfrika's Avatar
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      Quote Originally Posted by Elisa_Keisha
      ooooh no! I hate those songs... see my tv doesnt even works too well and I aint got no radio and I dont go to the club.. still the song keeps runnin thru my head "a ella le gusta la gasoliiiinaaa" ("she likes gasoline" wtf??) , no, no, no... and the video is even worse than 50cent videos... half (n not so half) nude girls shakin their asses around... well, u can imagin... all the songs sound the same and got the same nasty stupid lyrics and the same nasty videos.

      I respect reggaeton, but I cant support dudes like Daddy Yankee and their easy sold music.

      u know what I mean

      I would recommend artists like Kafu Banton or El Roockie (both from Panama)
      LOL!!!@"she likes gasoline"

      Okay Elisa...what about "EL General" (I believe he's from Panama too)??? Would you recomend him??? I LUUUUUUUUUV that song that goes...

      "BOOM BOOM Mami Mami *something I can't understand*
      Ayyyyyyyyyy Mami Mami *something I can't understand* "

    6. #6
      Elisa Keisha's Avatar
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      hmmm I remeber hearin a song by EL General somday, back in the day.... dun remember how it went but I remember I felt "ok" about it... lol.. thats not too expecific, will check it later, come back and give an opinion, but if the lyrics are wack, he will be wack to me.. lol, sorry Im a bit high

      Elisa Marvena Nyarai




      SANKOFA Asociacin Cultural
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    7. #7
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      Thumbs down Ummmmmmmm.....................


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      First of all....WHAT in the hell is 'reggaeton'????? I ain't never heard no mess like that in my life. Not until Mexicans decided to make something up. To me, 'CULO' and 'GASOLINA' sounds like REGGAE music but with Spanish lyrics. People need to get over it! NO ONE will ever be as inventive and artistically inclined in music as Black people.....N-E-V-E-R! That is what this all boils down to; trying to mimic Black music. Listen to those FRANKIE J and BABY BASH-type songs by Mexicans; ALL trying to sound like Black old-school artists. :???:

      They really need to get over it. Half that shit they play won't be remember five or ten years from now...just like much of this music now. Who remembers 'A Lighter Shade Of Brown'????

      Exactly. :wink:
      "Don't Let The World...Change Your Mind" ~~Maurice White Earth, Wind, and Fire ('Be Ever Wonderful'....'All 'N All ' album)

    8. #8
      Elisa Keisha's Avatar
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      I havent heard no mexican reggaeton so far.. I have heard reggaeton from Puerto Rico, Jamaica, Cuba, DR, Panama, etc... and its Black ppl who sing it. Black Caribbean ppl, but Black. That dont mean most of them dont suck, coz they do, but its still Black ppl.

      Elisa Marvena Nyarai




      SANKOFA Asociacin Cultural
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    9. #9
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      Quote Originally Posted by Denise X
      First of all....WHAT in the hell is 'reggaeton'????? I ain't never heard no mess like that in my life. Not until Mexicans decided to make something up. To me, 'CULO' and 'GASOLINA' sounds like REGGAE music but with Spanish lyrics. People need to get over it! NO ONE will ever be as inventive and artistically inclined in music as Black people.....N-E-V-E-R! That is what this all boils down to; trying to mimic Black music. Listen to those FRANKIE J and BABY BASH-type songs by Mexicans; ALL trying to sound like Black old-school artists. :???:

      They really need to get over it. Half that shit they play won't be remember five or ten years from now...just like much of this music now. Who remembers 'A Lighter Shade Of Brown'????

      Exactly. :wink:
      Damn sis...cheer up. Everytime you post it like "thumbs down" to something. It's gonna be aaight!!! What did Public Enemy say? "The bruthas (AND SISTAS) gonna work it out"

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      Daddy Yankee's music is Reggaeton, not Hip Hop.

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      Quote Originally Posted by Denise X
      First of all....WHAT in the hell is 'reggaeton'????? I ain't never heard no mess like that in my life. Not until Mexicans decided to make something up. To me, 'CULO' and 'GASOLINA' sounds like REGGAE music but with Spanish lyrics. People need to get over it! NO ONE will ever be as inventive and artistically inclined in music as Black people.....N-E-V-E-R! That is what this all boils down to; trying to mimic Black music. Listen to those FRANKIE J and BABY BASH-type songs by Mexicans; ALL trying to sound like Black old-school artists. :???:

      They really need to get over it. Half that shit they play won't be remember five or ten years from now...just like much of this music now. Who remembers 'A Lighter Shade Of Brown'????

      Exactly. :wink:
      You're very ignorant.

      First off, Reggaeton was started by Black spanish speaking people in Panama and went to Puerto Rico, not Mexico. I have yet to hear a Mexican artist attempt reggaeton. Secondly, Puerto Rico is an AFRO Caribbean country, they're Black just like us. They aren't ripping anyone off. Reggaeton IS reggae, but with spanish lyrics. Africans created the music. Read a book.

    12. #12
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      Thumbs down Whatever...


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      Quote Originally Posted by NewJerusalem
      You're very ignorant.

      First off, Reggaeton was started by Black spanish speaking people in Panama and went to Puerto Rico, not Mexico. I have yet to hear a Mexican artist attempt reggaeton. Secondly, Puerto Rico is an AFRO Caribbean country, they're Black just like us. They aren't ripping anyone off. Reggaeton IS reggae, but with spanish lyrics. Africans created the music. Read a book.
      'IGNORANT' hell! I can honestly say that I have not heard of no such music. I understand the orgin of REGGAE MUSIC; but the minute PIT BULL and a few other cuban/mexican/hispanic artist came out...that's when the name 'REGGAETON' became the style of music. I have heard a lot of people share my same sentiments. And just because Black people identify Cubans with Blacks doesn't mean THEY do the same. Especially if Cubans aren't giving proper respect to the originals of REGGAE music..which ARE Black people. So call me 'ignorant' or negative if ya want. I'm calling it as I see it.......
      "Don't Let The World...Change Your Mind" ~~Maurice White Earth, Wind, and Fire ('Be Ever Wonderful'....'All 'N All ' album)

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      Quote Originally Posted by Denise X
      'IGNORANT' hell! I can honestly say that I have not heard of no such music. I understand the orgin of REGGAE MUSIC; but the minute PIT BULL and a few other cuban/mexican/hispanic artist came out...that's when the name 'REGGAETON' became the style of music. I have heard a lot of people share my same sentiments. And just because Black people identify Cubans with Blacks doesn't mean THEY do the same. Especially if Cubans aren't giving proper respect to the originals of REGGAE music..which ARE Black people. So call me 'ignorant' or negative if ya want. I'm calling it as I see it.......
      It's ALWAYS been called Reggaeton= Spanish Reggae!. You never heard of Reggaeton?? Where are you from? Because in the Tri-State area it's always been popular. Ever heard of Tego Calderon?? He is the one who brought Reggaeton to the mainstream, not Pitbull or Daddy Yankee, and Tego is a Black Puerto Rican. I don't know if you've read Pitbull's articles or interviews but he has shown respect for Reggae artists and the king of Reggaeton, Tego Calderon.You have no idea what you're talking about.

    14. #14
      Jahness's Avatar
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      Greetings Everyone!

      Welcome to this very interesting discussion.

      Now, I have no clue who first started this reggaeton style of music. I can't even say when it started.

      What amazes me is the fact that so many of us are still arguing if this is black music, spanish music etc.

      Afrikan people are mixed into every culture of this society. Reggae music is global. Why would our spanish speaking AfrikAN BROTHERS AND SISTERS not be a part of this. I am sure they like music just like the rst of us.

      Now granted, some of the songs may not be in good taste or they may be portraying negative images of our spanish speaking sisters and brothers, but like anything else we all have choices to make. We must make a choice to listen or not to listen this music.

      Not because some of our people end up speaking spanish compliments of the slave trade, that does not mean they are not Afrikans. it's music, take it or leave it, but don't decide if it is good or bad based on how colonized our Afrikan people were.

      Wether or not you heard of it, if and when you do make a choice, that is all. Some of my closest friends were born in the Afrikan Spanish speaking countries. I say Afrikan spanish speaking countries, because we were all robbed of our original mother tongue of being able to be born on the Afrikan content. They are Afrikans who like us had no choice as to where they were born again compliments of the slave trade.

      Our shades of color are many. Identifying ourselves as Afrikan is our only challenge. We have to be conscious enough to not play the same game our oppressors played on us, the divide and conquer.

      I hear spanish versions of reggae and other Afrikan music all the time. Some of it I enjoy, some I don't. Since when did all music make sense. LOL We all just have to choose to keep with the positive so we all can benefit.

      Stay Blessed and focused.
      Posted In The Spirit of Learning & Sharing
      One Love & Respect Always

      ***************************************
      The Quest for knowledge stops at the grave.
      HIM Emperor Haile Selassie I.


      If you fail to prepare,
      you are preparing to fail!


      Mind what you want, because someone wants your mind.

      Working together, the ants ate the elephant.


    15. #15
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      Thank u Queen Jahness for bringin some truth, RESPECT and CONCIOUSNESS to the thread.

      Quote Originally Posted by Denise X
      Especially if Cubans aren't giving proper respect to the originals of REGGAE music..which ARE Black people
      I thought the originals of Reggae music are Jamaican people, who are as Black as Cuban people for the most part. so I sincerely doesnt understand your point.

      and as it has been said, Reggaeton started in Panama, by Black people (of Afrikan origins)

      Elisa Marvena Nyarai




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