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    1. #1
      Jahness's Avatar
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      Arrow Feds share coupons to help TV transition


      0 Not allowed! Not allowed!
      Feds share coupons to help TV transition

      By JOHN DUNBAR,
      Associated Press Writer

      Millions of $40 government coupons become available Tuesday to help low-tech television owners buy special converter boxes for older TVs that might not work after the switch to digital broadcasting.

      Beginning Feb. 18, 2009, anyone who does not own a digital set and still gets their programming via over-the-air antennas will no longer receive a picture.

      That's the day the television industry completes its transition from old-style analog broadcasting to digital.

      The converter boxes are expected to cost between $50 and $70 and will be available at most major electronics retail stores. Starting Tuesday, the National Telecommunications and Information Administration will begin accepting requests for two $40 coupons per household to be used toward the purchase of the boxes.

      Viewers who have satellite or cable service will not need a box.

      To request a coupon, consumers can apply online at http://www.dtv2009.gov starting Tuesday. The government also has set up a 24-hour hotline to take requests, 1-888-DTV-2009 (1-888-388-2009).

      Congress, in ordering the transition to digital broadcasting, set aside $1.5 billion for the coupon program, which will fund 33.5 million coupons and other costs.

      The giveaway basically works under the honor system.

      The first 22 million coupons will go to all households that request them. That includes a residence that gets cable service for one television but has a spare TV that still uses an antenna, for example.

      The rest of the coupons, however, are meant only for those who do not subscribe to a pay-television service.

      The Nielsen Co. estimates that 14.3 million households, or about 13 percent of the 112.8 million total television households in the nation, rely on over-the-air television broadcasts for programming.

      Tony Wilhelm, director of consumer education for NTIA, said the agency expects to have enough coupons to satisfy demand. "We think the high number will be 26 million," he said. "Low end is 10 million."

      Members of Congress have criticized both the National Telecommunications and Information Administration and the Federal Communications Commission for their work on the transition to digital television.

      In November, the Government Accountability Office, Congress' investigative arm, released a report that concluded there is "no comprehensive plan" for the transition.

      Most of the concern rests with public education campaigns. While Congress allocated $1.5 billion for the coupon program, only $5 million was for education. The Association for Public Television Stations reported in September that 51 percent of participants surveyed were unaware that the transition was taking place.

      Since then, the broadcast industry has announced a voluntary public education campaign. The FCC is circulating a plan among commissioners that would make public education efforts by broadcasters mandatory.

      Congress ordered the transition to digital broadcasting to make more efficient use of the publicly owned airwaves.

      On Jan. 24, the FCC will auction off the spectrum currently used for analog television. That portion of the airwaves will be sold to wireless providers and is expected to bring in as much as $15 billion. A portion of the spectrum will also be dedicated for use by emergency responders.

      ___

      On the Web:

      FCC information: http://www.dtv.gov/

      Copyright © 2008 The Associated Press.
      Posted In The Spirit of Learning & Sharing
      One Love & Respect Always

      ***************************************
      The Quest for knowledge stops at the grave.
      HIM Emperor Haile Selassie I.


      If you fail to prepare,
      you are preparing to fail!


      Mind what you want, because someone wants your mind.

      Working together, the ants ate the elephant.


    2. #2
      Jahness's Avatar
      Jahness is offline OniOni Warrior

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      Arrow Please Read! Coupons to help buy digital converters to upgrade TV signals


      0 Not allowed! Not allowed!
      Coupons to help buy digital converters

      By JOHN DUNBAR,
      Associated Press Writer

      Millions of $40 government coupons become available Tuesday to help low-tech television owners buy special converter boxes for older TVs that might not work after the switch to digital broadcasting.

      Beginning Feb. 18, 2009, anyone who does not own a digital set and still gets their programming via over-the-air antennas will no longer receive a picture.

      That's the day the television industry completes its transition from old-style analog broadcasting to digital.


      The converter boxes are expected to cost between $50 and $70 and will be available at most major electronics retail stores. Starting Tuesday, the National Telecommunications and Information Administration will begin accepting requests for two $40 coupons per household to be used toward the purchase of the boxes.

      Viewers who have satellite or cable service will not need a box.

      To request a coupon, consumers can apply online at http://www.dtv2009.gov starting Tuesday. The government also has set up a 24-hour hotline to take requests, 1-888-DTV-2009 (1-888-388-2009).

      Congress, in ordering the transition to digital broadcasting, set aside $1.5 billion for the coupon program, which will fund 33.5 million coupons and other costs.

      The giveaway basically works under the honor system.

      The first 22 million coupons will go to all households that request them. That includes a residence that gets cable service for one television but has a spare TV that still uses an antenna, for example.

      The rest of the coupons, however, are meant only for those who do not subscribe to a pay-television service.

      The Nielsen Co. estimates that 14.3 million households, or about 13 percent of the 112.8 million total television households in the nation, rely on over-the-air television broadcasts for programming.

      Tony Wilhelm, director of consumer education for NTIA, said the agency expects to have enough coupons to satisfy demand. "We think the high number will be 26 million," he said. "Low end is 10 million."

      Members of Congress have criticized both the National Telecommunications and Information Administration and the Federal Communications Commission for their work on the transition to digital television.

      In November, the Government Accountability Office, Congress' investigative arm, released a report that concluded there is "no comprehensive plan" for the transition.

      Most of the concern rests with public education campaigns. While Congress allocated $1.5 billion for the coupon program, only $5 million was for education. The Association for Public Television Stations reported in September that 51 percent of participants surveyed were unaware that the transition was taking place.

      Since then, the broadcast industry has announced a voluntary public education campaign. The FCC is circulating a plan among commissioners that would make public education efforts by broadcasters mandatory.

      Congress ordered the transition to digital broadcasting to make more efficient use of the publicly owned airwaves.

      On Jan. 24, the FCC will auction off the spectrum currently used for analog television. That portion of the airwaves will be sold to wireless providers and is expected to bring in as much as $15 billion. A portion of the spectrum will also be dedicated for use by emergency responders.

      ___

      On the Web:

      FCC information: http://www.dtv.gov/

      http://tv.yahoo.com/news/article/urn...FW8RmxVJGP2KwB



      Copyright © 2008 The Associated Press.
      Posted In The Spirit of Learning & Sharing
      One Love & Respect Always

      ***************************************
      The Quest for knowledge stops at the grave.
      HIM Emperor Haile Selassie I.


      If you fail to prepare,
      you are preparing to fail!


      Mind what you want, because someone wants your mind.

      Working together, the ants ate the elephant.


    3. #3
      Jahness's Avatar
      Jahness is offline OniOni Warrior

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      Arrow Retailers anxious over analog TV cut-off


      0 Not allowed! Not allowed!
      Retailers anxious over analog TV cut-off

      20 minutes ago

      Best Buy Inc.'s chief executive said Tuesday that he is "very nervous" about being able to supply customers with the millions of digital TV converter boxes needed ahead of the shutdown of most analog TV transmissions in 13 months.

      "I think it's one of the biggest risks our industry has," vice chairman and CEO Brad Anderson told an industry audience at the International Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas.

      Full-power television stations will turn off their analog signal on Feb. 17, 2009, after which they will broadcast in digital only. Viewers who receive their signals through an antenna instead of cable or satellite and don't have a digital-ready TV will have to buy a converter.

      The Nielsen Co. estimates that 14.3 million households rely on over-the-air television broadcasts for programming. Still others have sets that receive analog broadcasts as a complement to cable, satellite or digital sets in the same household.

      "The number of converter boxes that is going to be required could put tremendous pressure on us to solve all those problems" in a short time, said Anderson.

      "We're very nervous about the potential risk. Once it gets turned off, it could be very interesting," he added.

      Apart from the supply issue, customer education looms as a problem for the retailers. Speaking on the same panel, Phil Schoonover, the CEO of Circuit City Stores Inc. said Anderson's caution was appropriate. He contrasted the digital TV transition to the introduction of high-definition television sets, which mainly attracted the well-heeled and technically savvy.

      "I think it will feel very different in this next round of TVs, because we're through the early adopters," Schoonover said.

      At the same time, Schoonover defended the transition as "well thought out," and said it has been handled in a very responsible way.

      The airwaves to be vacated by the analog transmissions will be auctioned by the federal government to providers who will use them for wireless broadband services.

      Customers are likely to look to specialty electronics stores like Circuit City and Best Buy for guidance ahead of the transition. Steve Eastman, the Target Corp.'s vice president and general merchandising manager for consumer electronics, was less apprehensive about the digital transition.

      "From a category standpoint, I think it's great — it's getting people to talk a lot about HD and what technology they have in their home," he said.

      But he acknowledged that a lot has to be done to prepare. "The clock's ticking and this is coming very quickly," he said. The company plans to have converter boxes in stores by April.

      The converter boxes are expected to cost between $40 and $70. The National Telecommunications and Information Administration has begun accepting requests for two $40 coupons per household to be used toward the purchase of the boxes.

      http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20080109/...sQO901iZ9k24cA

      Copyright © 2008 The Associated Press.
      Posted In The Spirit of Learning & Sharing
      One Love & Respect Always

      ***************************************
      The Quest for knowledge stops at the grave.
      HIM Emperor Haile Selassie I.


      If you fail to prepare,
      you are preparing to fail!


      Mind what you want, because someone wants your mind.

      Working together, the ants ate the elephant.


    4. #4
      Jahness's Avatar
      Jahness is offline OniOni Warrior

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      Arrow The Unavoidable Update


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      The Unavoidable Update

      By ROY FURCHGOTT

      WHILE people like to complain that there is nothing to watch on television, about 21 million American households may find that literally true in February 2009. On the 17th of that month, most TV stations will quit broadcasting analog TV signals over the air, and older sets will go blank.

      But remarkably, half of the country does not realize a changeover is coming, according to a survey by the Cable and Telecommunications Association for Marketing.

      And despite advertising that proposes cable TV as the remedy for a dark screen, cable viewers with older sets 40 million of them, according to the Federal Communications Commission will be given a reprieve but not immunity. Three years after the over-the-air change, cable customers with analog sets could see the same blank screen. (By that time, most analog sets would be ancient.) The picture isnt entirely bleak for old sets. There are simple steps consumers with old TVs can take to ensure that American Idol is still on their screen next February.

      But consumers ready to make the transition may have a hard time learning how to prepare. After seeing ads about the conversion on television, Dale Hazelton, a former creative director at a direct response marketing firm living in New Hampton, N.Y., decided he wanted to keep watching free over-the-air TV. So he replaced his 20-year-old analog TV with a digital L.C.D. screen and bought a rooftop antenna that could receive over-the-air digital signals, all for about $700.

      Mr. Hazeltons antenna pulls in more than twice as many New York metro area stations as he used to get, all of them with a digital picture and 5.1 surround sound. The picture quality? Its unbelievable, he said.

      He had to do his research online, because he found a lot of misinformation in stores. I went into RadioShack to get the UHF antenna and they said, If you buy this, you know it wont work next year. The guy had no clue. He said, When TV goes digital, you have to have cable. I told them, You really need to learn about the stuff youre selling.

      A RadioShack spokesman, Charles Hodges, said the salesman may have been a new hire who had not received the training on digital TV that is required for all employees.

      Drawing the publics attention to the changeover has not been easy. Although government agencies, cable providers and broadcasters have promised to contribute what they say is $900 million worth of educational advertising, many people stop listening when they hear DTV. They think it is a sales pitch for premium cable service or for high-definition TV, said a Best Buy spokesman, Brian Lucas. I think its the kind of thing that it takes four or five times before people understand it applies to them, he said.

      To receive digital signals, a TV must have a digital tuner. Digital tuners were first required in some TVs beginning in 1998, but they werent required in all TVs until last year. Still, sets with analog-only receivers can still be found in stores.

      The first step is figuring out whether your TV has a digital receiver. If you bought your TV before 1998, it is almost certainly not digital. For any TV after that, check the manual under specifications for the tuner. If it says ATSC, it is digital. If it says NTSC, it is analog. Some TVs have both.

      If you dont have a manual, sometimes ATSC or NTSC is marked on the back of the TV. Or if your TV has a setup mode that automatically seeks channels, switch it on and see if it asks analog or digital. If it does, your TV is digital.

      If yours is one of the 21 million American households that the Government Accountability Office says has an analog TV, you are not forced to replace it. You could buy a converter box. The government, underwriting the cost of a converter box to let analog TVs play digital broadcasts, is giving out 33.5 million $40 coupons that would reduce the price of eligible converter boxes, expected to cost $50 to $70 after the discount. (Sorry, there are no coupons for TVs.)

      The perseverant consumer can download a coupon application at www.dtv2009.gov or call 888-388-2009. The hearing impaired can call 877-530-2634 for English or 866-495-1161 for Spanish. The applications may also be found in some stores and public libraries.

      In focus groups, over-the-air TV viewers showed an inclination to wait until the last minute to buy converter boxes, said Todd Sedmak, a spokesman for the National Telecommunications and Information Administration, which is running the coupon program. This older gent stuck in my mind, Mr. Sedmak said, because he was going to wait until next year. He said: Feb. 16, I am going down to Wally World, I am buying a new TV and a new converter box. The converter would allow him to keep using the old TV.

      But that gentleman risks a blank box on the 18th, unless he wants to pay full price for the converter. Coupons are limited in number, and they are first-come, first-served, up to two per household.

      Also of note to procrastinators: once issued, the coupons expire in 90 days.

      The converter boxes are just beginning to show up in stores, although they are still hard to find. The government says they should be available in about 15,000 outlets nationwide, and it has set up a Web site, www.dtv2009.gov/VendorSearch.aspx, to list those stores. But this week it was unable to find one within 50 miles of San Francisco or Manhattan. What about those 40 million cable TV viewers who have older analog sets? The cable companies have agreed to continue to broadcast the programs required by law in both analog and digital until 2012. The F.C.C. will reassess the agreement in 2011. It can drop the requirement at that time, keep the 2012 deadline or extend it.

      There is no consensus on how the industry will handle the changeover, said Brian Dietz, spokesman for the National Cable and Telecommunications Association. People with analog sets will need a new set-top cable box. The question will be whether cable companies give them out, sell them, rent them to users or tell customers to go to a store and find their own. Its up to the individual carriers, Mr. Dietz said.

      Some cable companies are already making the leap to all digital, like Bend Broadband in Bend, Ore. It has committed itself to supply all qualifying customers with a converter, free through 2008. With the digital conversion we will do, everyone will have a set-top box, said Amy Tykeson, the chief executive of Bend Broadband. The change will free bandwidth for other services, like high-definition channels, phone and faster Internet, she said.

      Verizon Fios, a fiber optic service offering pay TV, phone and high-speed Internet, stopped providing analog signals to new customers this month. For existing analog customers, that signal will be phased out. Customers can still use analog TVs with a converter box. Verizon may supply qualifying customers with one free converter and additional converters for $3.99 a month, although Sharon Cohen-Hagar, a Verizon spokeswoman, said terms of the offer were still being worked out.

      Satellite service subscribers fare a bit better. Their systems are already all digital but work with analog TVs. Our customers made the digital transition 13 years ago, said Robert Mercer, director of public relations for DirecTV. They are all set.

      http://www.nytimes.com/2008/01/24/te.../24basics.html

      Copyright 2008 The New York Times Company
      Posted In The Spirit of Learning & Sharing
      One Love & Respect Always

      ***************************************
      The Quest for knowledge stops at the grave.
      HIM Emperor Haile Selassie I.


      If you fail to prepare,
      you are preparing to fail!


      Mind what you want, because someone wants your mind.

      Working together, the ants ate the elephant.


    5. #5
      Jahness's Avatar
      Jahness is offline OniOni Warrior

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      Arrow We Interrupt This Broadcast


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      We Interrupt This Broadcast

      By JERROLD NADLER

      Washington

      ON Feb. 17, 2009, all broadcast television stations will end their analog transmissions and shift to digital signals. This is a complex process that involves spending billions of dollars to build new towers and antennas and to subsidize converter boxes for consumers who dont have digital TVs.

      In all this planning and spending on the transition to digital transmission, however, we have yet to address the question of white spaces. White spaces are the intervals between television channel frequencies to ensure that TV reception is not interrupted by other signals.

      The usefulness of these white spaces is about to be compromised by a proposal before the Federal Communications Commission by some of the nations largest technology companies. Microsoft, Google and others are asking permission to use white spaces free of charge for millions of unregulated and unlicensed devices for personal networking systems that they would like to sell, including P.D.A.s, wireless broadband devices and even toys.

      These devices could disrupt the new digital TV signals that government and industry have spent so much time and money to promote.

      In my district, which includes New Yorks theater district, performers use wireless microphones on these unused frequencies, as do news crews conducting live interviews on the street. Every major sports franchise relies on these channels for in-game communications and sideline interviews. And in rural areas, white spaces are often used for broadband access.

      Unlicensed devices, like wireless laptops and remote-controlled toys, operating in the white spaces will probably cause havoc to TV viewers, theater goers and sports fans. They could potentially render digital television sets and the government-subsidized converter boxes inoperable. Low-income households, the elderly and people living in multifamily buildings who dont have cable service and rely on antenna systems could be prevented from watching their favorite programs and from receiving important emergency information nationwide, thats 45 million to 60 million people.

      Unlicensed-device advocates say not to worry. They say theyll fix the problem if it arises. But last year, when the F.C.C. tested the sensing mechanism of some of these unlicensed devices, none of them detected broadcast and wireless signals consistently enough to avoid interfering with them.

      New Yorkers should be especially concerned. A person walking down the block looking up an address in his new P.D.A. could easily cause a television set to go blank or silence the wireless microphones worn by performers in a Broadway musical. At Giants Stadium, a quarterback could mess up an important play because he didnt hear directions being given to him by his coach through a wireless mike. And because these personal devices would be unregistered, there would be no effective way of recalling them or curtailing their use, much less assuring that standards were adhered to their manufacture.

      Legislation has been introduced in the House that calls for more research and testing of these devices and creates a timeline for their approval, giving priority to devices that provide broadband access to rural areas. Other devices would be considered only after the F.C.C. thoroughly tests the new digital transmission system.

      While we should encourage technical developments, we should urge the F.C.C. to proceed with caution.

      We cannot let these new developments undermine television service or hurt key sectors of our entertainment industry.

      Jerrold Nadler, a Democrat, is a congressman who represents parts of Brooklyn and Manhattan.

      http://www.nytimes.com/2008/02/09/op...ml?ref=opinion

      Copyright 2008 The New York Times Company
      Posted In The Spirit of Learning & Sharing
      One Love & Respect Always

      ***************************************
      The Quest for knowledge stops at the grave.
      HIM Emperor Haile Selassie I.


      If you fail to prepare,
      you are preparing to fail!


      Mind what you want, because someone wants your mind.

      Working together, the ants ate the elephant.


    6. #6
      Draptomania's Avatar
      Draptomania is offline Warrior

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      Arrow "dtv" Is Coming


      0 Not allowed! Not allowed!
      On February 17, 2009, federal law requires that all full-power television broadcast stations stop broadcasting in analog format and broadcast only in digital format. Heres what these requirements will mean for you and your television viewing.

      Why Are Broadcast TV Stations Switching to All-Digital?

      Congress mandated the conversion to all-digital television broadcasting, also known as the digital television (DTV) transition, because all-digital broadcasting will free up frequencies for public safety communications (such as police, fire, and emergency rescue). Also, digital is a more efficient transmission technology that allows broadcast stations to offer improved picture and sound quality, as well as offer more programming options for consumers through multiple broadcast streams (multicasting). In addition, some of the freed up frequencies will be used for advanced commercial wireless services for consumers.

      What Do I Need To Do To Be Ready For The DTV Transition?

      What you need to do depends on the source of your television programming, whether you receive programming over-the-air or from a paid provider such as a cable or satellite TV company.

      How Do I Receive Digital Broadcasts If I Dont Subscribe To Cable Or Satellite?

      If you receive only free over-the-air television programming, the type of TV you own, either a digital TV or an analog TV, is very important. Consumers who receive only free over-the-air television may view digital programming through a TV set with a built-in digital tuner (integrated DTV) or a digital-ready monitor with a separate digital tuner set-top box. (Both of these digital television types are referred to as a DTV). The only additional equipment required to view over-the-air digital programming with a DTV is a regular antenna, either on your roof or a smaller version on your TV such as rabbit ears.

      If you have an analog television, you will have to purchase a digital-to-analog set-top converter box to attach to your TV set to be able to view over-the-air digital programming (see What About My Analog TV? below).

      How Do I Know Whether I Own a DTV?

      As of March 1, 2007, all television receivers shipped in interstate commerce or imported into the United States must contain a digital tuner. In addition, effective May 25, 2007, the Commission required sellers of television receiving equipment that does not include a digital tuner to disclose at the point-of-sale that such devices include only an analog tuner, and therefore will require a digital-to-analog converter box to receive over-the-air broadcast television after the transition date. Retailers must inform consumers by prominently displaying the following text if they are selling TV equipment with only an analog tuner:

      This television receiver has only an analog broadcast tuner and will require a converter box after February 17, 2009, to receive over-the-air broadcasts with an antenna because of the Nations transition to digital broadcasting. Analog-only TVs should continue to work as before with cable and satellite TV services, gaming consoles, VCRs, DVD players, and similar products. For more information, call the Federal Communications Commission at 1-888-225-5322 (TTY: 1-888-835-5322) or visit the Commissions digital television website at: www.dtv.gov.

      Therefore, after May 25, 2007, all television equipment being sold should contain a digital tuner, or should be identified at the point-of-sale as not having one. Be sure to look for this label if you are purchasing a new TV.

      As for how to determine whether your television equipment purchased prior to May 25, 2007 is a DTV, many DTVs and digital television equipment will have labels or markings on them, or statements in the informational materials that came with them, to indicate that they contain digital tuners. These labels or markings may contain the words Integrated Digital Tuner or Digital Tuner Built-In. Receiver may be substituted for Tuner, and DTV, ATSC, or HDTV (high definition television) may be substituted for Digital. If your television equipment contains any of these labels or markings, you should be able to view digital over-the-air programming without the need for a digital-to-analog converter box. (Remember, you do not need an HDTV to view free over-the-air digital programming. As long as your television equipment contains a digital tuner, you can view over-the-air digital. An HDTV is only necessary if you want to view digital programming in high definition.)

      You should also check the manual or any other materials that came with your television equipment in order to determine whether it contains a digital tuner.

      If your television set is labeled as a Digital Monitor or HDTV Monitor, or as Digital Ready or HDTV Ready, this does not mean it actually contains a digital tuner. Thus, you still will likely need a separate set-top box which contains a tuner in order to view programs in the new digital TV transmission standard (which includes HDTV formats) on such a set.

      Over-the-air digital set-top boxes can be purchased at retail stores. Cable and satellite TV providers also sell or lease digital set-top boxes for their specific services. (Note: the digital set-top box described here is not the same as the NTIA program digital-to-analog converter box, described below, used to convert free over-the-air digital broadcasts for viewing on an analog TV set.)

      If your television set is labeled as analog or NTSC, but is NOT labeled as containing a digital tuner, it contains an analog tuner only.

      If you cannot determine whether your television set or other television equipment contains a digital tuner, you are advised to check your equipment for the manufacturer name and model number, and then contact your consumer electronics retailer, or the manufacturer, to determine whether it contains a digital tuner. This information also may be available online through the manufacturers website.

      Because most broadcast stations in all U.S. television markets are already broadcasting in digital, consumers are further advised to contact their local broadcast stations to determine the channel numbers on which the stations are broadcasting digital programming. Consumers should then ensure that their televisions are set up to receive over-the-air programming (as distinguished from the signals of a paid provider such as cable or satellite TV service), and then tune to the over-the-air digital channels to see if they can receive the digital broadcast programming.

      What About My Analog TV? Will It Still Work?

      After February 17, 2009, you will be able to receive and view over-the-air digital programming with an analog TV only by purchasing a digital-to-analog set-top converter box. Between January 1, 2008, and March 31, 2009, all U.S. households will be able to request up to two coupons, worth $40 each, to be used toward the future purchase of eligible digital-to-analog converter boxes. Eligible converter boxes are for the conversion of over-the-air digital television signals, and therefore are not intended for analog TVs connected to a paid provider such as cable or satellite TV service.

      The National Telecommunications and Information Administration (NTIA) is administering the coupon program. For more information, visit the NTIA website at www.dtv2009.gov. The Commissions DTV website, www.dtv.gov, also provides information for consumers on the upcoming digital-to-analog converter box coupon program. More detailed information regarding NTIAs coupon program, what digital-to-analog converter boxes will be eligible, where and when they may be purchased, and the related costs involved will be provided by the Commission and NTIA as the commencement of the coupon program on January 1, 2008, approaches.

      If I Already Have an Antenna, Do I Need a New One to View the Digital Signals?

      A special antenna generally is not needed to receive digital signals. You may have antenna issues, however, if your current antenna does not receive UHF signals (channels 14 and above) well, because most DTV stations are on UHF channels. In such a case, you may need a new antenna or to add a UHF section to your existing antenna system. This equipment should be available at most bricks-and-mortar and Internet consumer electronics retailers.

      How Do I Receive Digital Broadcasts If I Subscribe To Cable Or Satellite?

      If you receive cable or satellite television service, contact your cable or satellite provider about any additional components, such as a digital set-top box, that you may need to watch digital broadcast programming.

      If I Buy a DTV, Will My VCR, DVD Player, Camcorder, Video Games, Or Other Equipment Still Work?

      VCRs, DVD players, camcorders and video games will continue to work, even if they are only analog-capable. Such equipment, however, may not provide digital-quality picture and sound. Manufacturers are producing a number of different connectors to hook equipment together and improve picture and sound quality. Check with your equipment retailer to determine the types of connectors that will work with your equipment.

      How Much Will DTV Improve My TV Viewing?

      While picture quality will vary according to whether you watch digital programming in high definition (HDTV) or standard definition (SDTV) format, over-the-air digital programming provides a better viewing experience than over-the-air analog programming, as long as you have good quality reception through your antenna.

      How Much Will a DTV Cost?

      Prices vary depending on the many features and options available to consumers, including format, display technology, and screen size. Display technology choices include cathode ray tube screens, rear projection TVs, front projection TVs, and flat panel TVs. Flat panel TVs, often the most expensive, can use either a liquid crystal display (LCD) or plasma screen technology. Screen size is measured diagonally across the screen, and the larger the screen, generally the more expensive the TV. To determine the equipment and features that are right for you, learn about DTV from our Web Site and discuss your options with your retailer.

      For More Information

      For more information about the DTV transition, go to www.dtv.gov, which also provides links to several other informative websites, or contact the FCCs Consumer Center by e-mailing dtvinfo@fcc.gov; calling 1-888-CALL-FCC (1-888-225-5322) voice or 1-888-TELL-FCC (1-888-835-5322) TTY; faxing 1-866-418-0232; or writing to:

      Federal Communications Commission
      Consumer and Governmental Affairs Bureau
      Consumer Inquiries and Complaints Division
      445 12th Street, SW
      Washington, DC 20554.


      http://www.fcc.gov/cgb/consumerfacts/digitaltv.html
      ~Insert profound statement here~

    7. #7
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      Whoops! Asante Sana for looking out, Sis. Queen Jahness
      ~Insert profound statement here~

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      Quote Originally Posted by Draptomania View Post
      Whoops! Asante Sana for looking out, Sis. Queen Jahness
      Greetings Queen Draptomania!

      No problem sis. Always a pleasure to help and serve. !

      Peace!
      Posted In The Spirit of Learning & Sharing
      One Love & Respect Always

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      ^^bump to remind ^^
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    10. #10
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      I wonder why the push to digital...analog is a decent signal.

      I'm just curious to the push, especially when the offer is free.

      I have an HDTV, it's ok. I have a QAM digital tuner, and the reception from the atennae is nice. Only certain shows and channels broadcast in 1080i. Evrtyhting eles was 720p..which I did not like. I got cable for my wife, I really don't watch TV, I use it to play games.

      Oddly though, all the cable HD channels are in 1080i only. None use the 720p, and no channles yet come in 1080p...but if you have a full HDTV you can upscale to 1080p.

      Mines' is 720p, so it really won't matter to me for another year.

    11. #11
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      ive had more problems with channels comen up blank since goin digital...

      but my FIRST question i had to wonder when i started hearin bout all this was....

      what about independent broadcasters.... what will happen to public acess networks ???

    12. #12
      G.O.D.F.A.T.H.A.'s Avatar
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      Thats where the internet comes into play. The analog feature will now become online tv shows. Public Access shows for example will now be watched on your computer.





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      J Hill is offline Premium Member

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      I dont know, it's just odd that the government is pushing so hard for this digital change over. Yea I understand the freeing up of frequencies, but there is other means to piggy back on the frequencies already on hand.

      I just dont know why they pushing so tough for this *scratches head*

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      Digital is better in everyway when it comes to content delivery. What does that mean in laymen terms? With all tv digital, tv can become like the internet where the channels & content can become unlimited and accessible at a much faster rate than before. Think of being able to download movies straight from (pick your store) then watch them anytime you want. Since the major tv networks still run stuff they will control the access and content. Right now the internet's access is controlled but its content is only loosely control – highly controlled by some countries. Does this explain the big push no not yet but it does explain why all entertainment corporations would lobby to make the government pass laws (which they've already done) to force the issue.

      To understand and see a similar push you need to look no further than the digitizing of music. At one time all music and all music equipment were analog which means only a very small group of companies controlled music. This by definition of capitalism isn't a good thing. Then CDs come out which are quasi digital and the same happen with the music equipment which was analog and digital. But now you have people putting music on there computers and transferring it across the internet at lightening speeds and some people now play majority of their music on some type of hard drive rather it's on a actually laptop/desktop or iPod or another mp3 player. Here in this example the push is still going towards digital. Because one set of lobbyist are stopping the government from passing laws beneficial to groups like the RIAA, who hate the idea of digital music, but can't get other companies nor the government to help stop it. In the mist of lawsuits by the RIAA, Apple one of the biggest companies in ameriKKKa openly was against them and released the iTunes & iPod which encourages the spread of digital music. There are many others that followed suit against the RIAA wishes.

      So when it comes to a push by the gov. you know there is a lot of money involved and companies lobbying heavily to get the money off of consumer products.
      "If the enemy is not doing anything against you, you are not doing anything"
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      "Cowardice asks the question: is it safe? Expediency asks the question: is it political? Vanity asks the question: is it popular? But conscience asks the question: is it right? And there comes a time when one must take a position that is neither safe, nor political, nor popular - but one must take it simply because it is right."
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      only thing i like about digital is ordering movies....

      but Godfather.... good point !!!

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