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    1. #1
      JrFem's Avatar
      JrFem is offline Warrior

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      Spirituality and Hair


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      I came across this online

      10. Should I let people touch my dredlocks?

      No, no, no! Under no circumstances should you be allowing strangers to touch your hair. Some believe that dreds are the antennae to God, while others believe that hair is an extension of one's spiritual self. In any case, strangers who request to touch anybody, anywhere, for any reason, are offensive. Playing with someone's hair constitutes foreplay. Hair touching is for family and intimates only.
      I was wondering what is the connection between your hair and your spirituality? Any specific religions? Any specific differences between men and women?
      -jennia
      "forward ever"

    2. #2
      IfasehunReincarnated's Avatar
      IfasehunReincarnated is offline Never Let Them Disrespect the Ancestors

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      is there a connection? - yes.
      in what religions? - all religions of all people of color. without exception.
      differences between men and women? - in importance? no.

      here is the full article that holds your quote:
      ================================================== =============

      Unlocking the Mystery of Dredlocks




      By wildflower

      Hair can be a sensual extension of oneself, and it can take on many different styles. Hairstyles are a form of self-expression; sometimes "style" evolves into something more meaningful. Once upon a time, Black Americans wore Afros as a symbol of pride. Afros have made a comeback, but more and more people these days are deciding to wear dredlocks. When people think of dredlocks, reggae revolutionary Bob Marley comes to mind — wailing guitar in hand, singing his soul into the microphone with his signature swinging dreds.

      But dredlocks are no longer reserved for reggae bands. Nowadays, people who aren't ready for the commitment of dreds can get synthetic ones. People whose hair isn't conducive to dreding have developed unorthodox methods to achieve the look. There are many myths and misconceptions about dredlocks. This information will clarify some frequently asked questions.

      1. How do you get dredlocks?

      Some people choose to twist their hair themselves, using a variety of gels and pomades, usually getting a variety of results. To foster locks with a refined and uniform appearance, I recommend seeing a locktician, someone with experience and knowledge of dredlocks and the locking process.

      2. How do you wash dredlocks?

      The same way you wash any type of hair. Shampoo every one or two weeks with any brand of mild shampoo, but preferably natural products.

      3. How do you maintain dredlocks?

      Most people believe dreds require no maintenance. However, it's just the opposite. The scalp should be massaged, moisturized and oiled to prevent dryness. Also, new growth should be twisted to maintain the integrity of the locks. Better lockticians provide this service.

      4. Why do people's dreds look so different?

      Locking is an art, not a science. The appearance depends somewhat on how they were started, the texture of hair, the size of the twists and how often the locks are groomed — even on the person's diet. Some people believe in no upkeep of locks besides washing, and this is reflected in the appearance of their locks.

      5. Is everybody with dreds a Rastafarian?

      No. While dredlocks are heavily associated with Rastafari, Jesus Christ and Samson of the Old Testament were Nazarenes, and according to Hebrew law were mandated to lock (Numbers 6:5). Some Hindus even take the growing of locks as a sacrament. In the Americas, escaped slaves wore locks as a badge of honor, and some West Africans wore them in defiance of slave traders.

      6. Can you take dredlocks out?

      No, you can't, and you shouldn't. The only way to take them out is to cut them off.

      7. Can you style dredlocks?

      Absolutely. Because of growing popularity and mainstream acceptance, people have discovered healthy ways to curl and style dredlocks without damaging them.

      8. Do dreds pose a problem with employment?

      They shouldn't - federal law protects your right to wear your hair in its natural state. Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 states in part that " . . .discrimination on the basis of an immutable characteristic associated with race, such as skin color, hair texture, or certain facial features violates Title VII, even though not all members of the race share the same characteristic." Dredlocks, as well as other natural hairstyles, are becoming more acceptable in corporate America. Personally, everyone I know with dreds is gainfully, even corporately, employed.

      9. Do dreds make your hair grow?

      Yes. Human hair generally grows at a rate of about six inches a year. With dredlocks, hair will grow faster — there's no strain on hairs from combing or brushing. And since no harsh chemicals are used, your hair will be much healthier.

      10. Should I let people touch my dredlocks?

      No, no, no! Under no circumstances should you be allowing strangers to touch your hair. Some believe that dreds are the antennae to God, while others believe that hair is an extension of one's spiritual self. In any case, strangers who request to touch anybody, anywhere, for any reason, are offensive. Playing with someone's hair constitutes foreplay. Hair touching is for family and intimates only.

      11. So what about a locktician? Don't they count? If it's a natural process, why do I need to go to one anyway?

      Great question. First, common sense should tell you to pick a locktician with dredlocks, creating a closed spiritual circuit while she or he is grooming and cultivating your locks. Choose a locktician who takes the most organic, natural approach possible. While it is true that you can twist and take care of your own locks, as with many time-consuming grooming details, you're liable to miss something, poison your hair with bad products, or just plain mess it up. Appearance is an important part of who you are: seeing a locktician is a good investment in cultivating the spirit, look, style and strength of your hair naturally. Anything worth doing is worth doing right.

      12. How do I know if I'm ready for dredlocks?

      Don't take it lightly — it's a very personal and spiritual decision. Growing dredlocks is a permanent change that requires patience. It changes the way you see the world and the way the world sees you.

      First published: February 07, 2002
      All is Well. Workin' Hard - Tryin' to Save Time for Fam. Check in Periodically.

    3. #3
      IfasehunReincarnated's Avatar
      IfasehunReincarnated is offline Never Let Them Disrespect the Ancestors

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      The History of Dreadlocks

      by Bouneith Inejnema Naba

      Many times I have heard friends admit to me that, because they have dreadlocks, they have been approached in the street by someone who wanted to sell them marijuana. The sellers approached these individuals solely because they had dreadlocked hair; none of the individuals used drugs or associated with those who do use. Dreadlocks have become so much associated with Rastafarian culture, which is, in turn, associated with smoking ganga, that few people know the real roots and history of dreadlocked hair. What are the traditional origins and meanings of dreadlocks?

      New-generation Rastafarians will tell you that the culture of locked hair came, originally, from Africa, but any knowledge beyond the continent that locks came from is unknown. Where old-generation Rastafarians hold great pride in their natural hair and see it as a symbol of their fight against Babylon, non-violence, non-conformity, communalism and solidarity, and as a heavy spiritual statement, many new-generation Rastas see their dreads as a passport to smoking ganga and listening to Reggae music, not understanding the real Rastafarian culture and values. Where Rastafarians once shunned everything from Babylon, such as soda, alcohol and cigarettes, modern Rastas are often seen smoking, wearing designer clothing, eating meat and drinking beer. Wearing your hair ÒnaturallyÓ has become more of a status symbol than a spiritual decision, and people begin locking their hair so that they are seen as conscious, afrocentric, or different, rather than for honest spiritual and conscious reasons.

      Dreadlocks have been a part of the history of every spiritual system. From Christianity to Hinduism, locked hair has been been a symbol of a highly spiritual person who is trying to come closer to God(s). If one is to research the spiritual history and meaning of locks, they will be mentioned in all holy books (the biblical Sampson wore his hair in dreadlocks, and his unsurpassed strength was lost when Delilah cut off his seven locks of hair) and cultures. DreadlockÕs roots are commonly traced back to Hinduism and the God Shiva, but stops there. Meanwhile, most people recognize that dreadlocks have their origin in Africa, but nobody seems to know where, how or why! As with everything else, the true origins of dreadlocks can be found in Kemet (Africa).

      ÒOriginally, dreadlocks were the mark of spiritual status,Ó Dogon Priest and Kemetic Spiritual Master Naba Lamoussa Morodenibig of The Earth Center explained in an interview. ÒPriests of diverse Deities were required, at least for a specific period of time, to have dreadlocks. For example, priests of Deities that are involved in the healing of the body and with procreation, such as Wsr, Heru, Theouris and Sekhmet, are required to have dreadlocks. There is a period of seven to thirteen years that a priest of these Deities must let their hair grow freely and devote themselves completely to the Deity. During this time, the priest has a role of responsibility towards the God and the temple. After that time period, if they want to cut their hair, a ceremony is done and they can remove their locks if they choose. Interest-ingly, for other Deities, like Aishat, one must shave every hair on their body when serving that God or Goddess. It depends on which God and temple is being served.Ó

      What is it about hair that is so important for priests and temples? ÒIt is a notion of purity. Hairs are huge emitters and receptors. When one is in an area, such as a temple, where the flow of energy must be tightly controlled, hair becomes either very helpful or very disturbant, depending on the energetic needs,Ó Master Naba explained. ÒEven when a hair falls off of the body, it does not lose its qualities, and it can become a big disturbance to the flow of energy.Ó Even animals that are sacrificed are checked thoroughly for a specific type of fur. It is not every ram or cow that can be used in a ceremony - it is only a priest who can safely determine whether an animal is fit for sacrifice, and it is a heavy responsibility to do so. The untrained eye will think that any animal will do, but if there is one piece of the wrong kind of fur on an animal, it cannot be used!

      It is known that many Pharaohs had locked hair, and on TutankhamenÕs mummy, dreadlocks can still be found intact. How did dreadlocks become such a symbol of Rastafarian belief and culture rather than of African spirituality? Master Naba offered his knowledge: ÒDreadlocks in spirituality has a very high value. During pre-colonial Africa, healers and priests in many parts of the continent carried dreadlocks, and every religion that has come has adopted the idea of either having dreadlocks or shaving all hair on the body. In the Bible, it states that those who donÕt shave, drink alcohol or eat meat are the closest to God; Jesus himself is shown with long hair! In Islam, shaving is seen as a value of cleanliness. To associate dreadlocks with only Rastafarianism is unfair. But, in the history of Black people, Rastafarianism became a politico-spiritual movement after the prophesy of Marcus Garvey surfaced. It gave Black people a spirit of hope, and the Rastafarian then adopted the attitudes of African priests: they kept their hair like a priest, did not eat red meat, drink alcohol, use drugs or smoke cigarettes. They decided to stay spiritually hopeful, and the dreadlocks represented, instead of a priest serving a temple for seven years, a period of time spent waiting for something to happen.Ó

      Dreadlocks carry a very heavy spiritual meaning that is virtually unknown in todayÕs modern society. Now worn as a fashion statement, a political message, or as a rebellion, many people, young and old alike, have no idea what dreadlocks mean spiritually, and they do not know the position they are putting themselves in by having locked hair. ÒDreadlocks carry the notion of devotion and sacrifice to the Deities, according to the spiritual rules,Ó says Master Naba, the only Dogon/Kemetic priest who has been commis-sioned by the committee of elders in Africa to bring initiatic knowledge outside of trad-itional initiation camps. ÒDread-locks carry a very heavy spiritual bur-den. It is only people that have conscious-ly decided to take a vow of purity and to follow all of the seventy-seven commandments and apply them to all aspects of their lives that should wear dreadlocks. People of any race or gender can wear them, because spirit-ually we are the same, but the one who has dreadlocks must understand the spiritual meaning behind them if they do not want to face negative consequences.Ó
      All is Well. Workin' Hard - Tryin' to Save Time for Fam. Check in Periodically.

    4. #4
      IfasehunReincarnated's Avatar
      IfasehunReincarnated is offline Never Let Them Disrespect the Ancestors

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      All is Well. Workin' Hard - Tryin' to Save Time for Fam. Check in Periodically.

    5. #5
      JrFem's Avatar
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      Learned


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      Asante rafiki...I have learned new things today.
      -jennia
      "forward ever"

    6. #6
      IfasehunReincarnated's Avatar
      IfasehunReincarnated is offline Never Let Them Disrespect the Ancestors

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      Certain people are supposed to have long hair and locs are the perfect way to maintain it. Some people should grow their hair from time to time to supply them with fortification through certain periods of their life. We should take serious consideration to cutting substantial amounts of our hair off. We should also look for indicators in our life when our hair seems to be unhealthy or falling out. Not all hair loss is negative. Some is hereditary, some is linked to spiritual energy in your body and your hair just reacts to that.

      We usually let our hair grow to mark the beginning of significant spiritual journeys, unless the journey begins with ridding onesself of something else you dont need anymore.

      We watch what we put in our heads and who touchs our head. In 15 years the number of people to touch my head is less than one person a year. in the case of the last 8 years probably only 3 people have touched my head.
      All is Well. Workin' Hard - Tryin' to Save Time for Fam. Check in Periodically.

    7. #7

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      Is this just in the case with locs, or should noone touch your head period except those who are maybe doing hair care.
      "I come with my heart bearing truth, and there are no lies in it..."

    8. #8
      Kwilu's Avatar
      Kwilu is offline Warrior

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      What about the many people who wear locs for "fashion"?

      And I am talking about the white people who wear them clueless about the whole African spiritual system behind it?

      Kwilu.

    9. #9
      Imara's Avatar
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      [IMG]C:\Documents and Settings\Administrator\Desktop\kenia.jpg[/IMG]

      DreadLocks History

      DreadLocks have been around since the dawn of time. Ancient Egyptians wore them, ancient Asian emperor's wore them, cavemen wore them, even John the Baptist and Samson wore them.

      The first writing we have about dreadlocks is in the Veda scriptures of India, the earliest piece is dated to 1800 BC. But many peoples and tribes have worn dreadlocks the Germanic tribes, the Greeks,Samson and other Nazorites, John the Baptist, the Pacific peoples, and the Naga Indians also wore dreadlocks. King Tut himself had dreadlocks, and they are still intact to this day. The Mau Mau tribe wore dreadLocks to intimidate the colonizers of Kenya in east Africa. Even Caesar claimed that the Celts wore dreadLocks by describing them as having "hair like snakes".
      The actual word dreadlocks comes from Jamaica, made up in the early movement of the Rastamen, dreadlocks came from the word Dread for the meaning of fear and horror.
      Locks are now worn in India by Sadhus (holy men), the Somali, the Galla, the Maasai, the Mau Mau, the Kau, the Ashanti, the Fulani, the Aborigines, and the New Guineans.



      (mou´ mou&180 , secret insurgent organization in Kenya , comprising mainly Kikuyu tribespeople. They were bound by oath to force the expulsion of white settlers from Kenya. In 1952 the Mau Mau began reprisals against the Europeans, especially in the “white highlands,” claimed as Kikuyu lands. The settlers retaliated and non-participant Kikuyu were killed by the Mau Mau. Jomo Kenyatta and other nationalist leaders were imprisoned. By 1956, however, British troops hunted down the Mau Mau in the mountain forests. Most leaders were captured and executed. Later the entire Kikuyu tribe was resettled within a guarded area. The state of emergency decreed (1952) in Kenya was ended in 1960 and Kenyatta was released; he subsequently became prime minister (1963) upon independence, and president (1964) when the country became a republic

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      I disagree with some of what the first article proposes about loc grooming. She seems to have a disdain for organic or freeform approaches.

      But to answer your question, I try to view all things spiritually. My decision to loc is a reflection of that along with an embracing of unconditional love and acceptance of self. However, I do understand that everyone has their own way, therefore I don't make assumptions about someone or project the values I have for myself on them simply because of how they choose to style or groom themselves.

    11. #11
      GoodRain's Avatar
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      Quote Originally Posted by JrFem
      I came across this online



      I was wondering what is the connection between your hair and your spirituality? Any specific religions? Any specific differences between men and women?
      Natural Nubian kinky hair and act as antennaes the The Most High providing that your mind is right.
      Dreds and braids are just putting worship to the kinkiest hair texture of 9 ether.
      Only Nubians with the greatest roots have the kinkiest 9 ether hair. Alot of us have between 8 ether and 9 ether. 8 represents a more curly type. 7 wavey and six straight. The American Indian's hair is neither. It has a circular look when seen under a microscope because of specific ET genes that has effected us all in one way or another.

    12. #12
      RecoveringAA's Avatar
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      Greetings of AFreekan Love Family,

      I AM Queen Warrior Abena, a RE~covering Afreekan enslaved in amerikkka and RE~presenting the Voices in the Margins.

      Quote Originally Posted by Venusian
      I disagree with some of what the first article proposes about loc grooming. She seems to have a disdain for organic or freeform approaches.

      But to answer your question, I try to view all things spiritually. My decision to loc is a reflection of that along with an embracing of unconditional love and acceptance of self. However, I do understand that everyone has their own way, therefore I don't make assumptions about someone or project the values I have for myself on them simply because of how they choose to style or groom themselves.

      Asante sana for sharing! I agree with your points and primary reason for locking as this was a major part of my decision as welll..."view all things spiritually. My decision to loc is a reflection of that along with an embracing of unconditional love and acceptance of self".

      also, I have thoroughly enjoyed caring for my hair without assistance and without paying an arm and leg!. this was also a part of my reasoning and decision to BE naturally ME. Freedom from the financial burden of paying someone to DO what I was capable of DO~ing myself. I asked questions of ppl who had locks, read books and relied on my Spirit which is connected to THE SPIRIT for guidance and care of my locs.
      Therefore, i feel no need to purchase the services of a loctician. I have been once and this was a treat i gave myself.

      Medaase for allowing me to share

    13. #13
      IfasehunReincarnated's Avatar
      IfasehunReincarnated is offline Never Let Them Disrespect the Ancestors

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      There is a traditional AFRIKAN process of locing that involved manipulation or "twisting" of the hair. It's perfectly acceptable. While most people do it because they do not prefer the "rastafarian" style of locing, in this case it is still a very Afrikan way to loc. In fact, one can pray and "loc" certain energy during prayer while "twisting". Both processes are valid, none is better than the other.

      There are even many examples of groomed hair, including locs have groomed and trimmed ends. Again, we may do it here for "whatever" reason, mostly cosmetic, but it does have Afrikan origins.

      In my experience what's important is that we not get attached to our locs. There may come a period when you have to cut them. Westerners seem to struggle with this way more than they need to. They see locs as a part of their "identity" when in fact, locs are a spiritual tool first and foremost. Everything else is really very unimportant.
      All is Well. Workin' Hard - Tryin' to Save Time for Fam. Check in Periodically.

    14. #14
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      WombanAuset is offline Sacred Militant Womb-Man

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      Archive Bump
      Ahoofe ntua ka, suban pa na hia- physical beauty does not count much, it is good character that counts.
      See a black man dead, from a white man's powder
      See a white man scared, from a black man's power~Timbaland

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      Pain's Avatar
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      When one is in training to become an Okomfo in the Akan priesthood wearing the hair in the style of dreadlocks is customary. Akans refer to it as Mpesi Mpesi. This is a very old African practice indeed.

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