Your name or email adress:
Do you already have an account?
Forgot your password?
  • Log in or Sign up


    Results 1 to 5 of 5
    1. #1
      Pragmatic's Avatar
      Pragmatic is offline Moderator

      Join Date
      Nov 2005
      Location
      San Diego
      Posts
      2,815
      Blog Entries
      13
      Thumbs Up/Down
      Received: 22/0
      Given: 9/0
      Rep Power
      297

      Black Indians and Sambhu, God of Asia--Dr Eugene Adams


      0 Not allowed! Not allowed!






      Anywhere is the Center of the World


      Black Elk (Holy man of the Oglala Sioux)

      Then I was standing on the highest mountain of them all, and round about beneath was the hoop of the world. I while I stood there I saw more than I can tell you and I understood more than I saw; for I was seeing in a sacred manner the shapes of all things in the spirit, and the shape of all shapes as they must live together as one being.

      And I say the sacred hoop of my people was one of the many hoops that made one circle, wide as daylight and as starlight, and in the center grew one grew one mighty flowering tree to shelter all the children of one mother and one father. And I saw that it was holy...

      But anywhere is the center of the world.
















      1. Chakra Discussions
        How Vaishnavas worship Lord Shiva

        by Nirguna dasi
        Reposted Feburary 16, 2004

        February 16th, 2004 is Shivaratri. Vaishnavas and Vrajavasis celebrate by seeking Lord Shiva's blessings and worship him in his form as a gopi at the ancient temple of Gopishwara in Vrindavan.
        "It is said, vaishnavanam yatha sambhu: Lord Shiva is the best of devotees of Lord Krishna. In Vrindavan there is Lord Shiva's temple called Gopishwara. The gopis used to worship not only Lord Shiva but Katyayani (Durga) as well, but their aim was to attain the favour of Lord Krishna. A devotee of Lord Krishna does not disrespect Lord Shiva, but worships Lord Shiva as the most exalted devotee of Lord Krishna. Consequently, whenever a devotee worships Lord Shiva he prays to Lord Shiva to achieve the favour of Krishna and he does not request material profit." (Purport to Srimad Bhagavatam 4. 24.30.)
        Srila Bhaktisiddhanta Saraswati Thakur offered these prayers wriiten for Gopishwara Mahadev when he visited the Lingaraj temple in Bhubaneshwar on June 22nd, 1922:
        Vrindavanvani-pate jaya soma soma
        maule sanandana-sanatana-naradeya
        gopishvara vraja-vilasi-yuganghri-padme
        prema prayaccha nirupadhi namo namas te "O Shiva, O gatekeeper of Vrindavan! O you who are accompanied by Uma (Parvati)! O you who carry the moon in your hair! O lord worshiped by Sananda-kumar, Sanat-Kumar and Narada Muni! O Gopishwar, the worshipable deity of the gopis! Desiring that you bestow upon me love for the divine couple, Sri Sri Radha Madhava, who perform joyous pastimes in Vraja, I offer my obeisances unto you again and again." (Srila Vishwanatha Chakravarti's Sri Sankalpa-kalpadrum, cited in vol. 7 of Sri Krishna Kathamritam)
        It is related that Lord Shiva desiring to witness the Rasa Lila is stopped from crossing the Yamuna by goddess Vrinda. Shiva protests this refusal of entry, saying he is a great devotee of Krishna and should be allowed to participate in His most wonderful pastime with the Gopis.
        Vrinda devi's rejoinder is firm: "Krishna is the only male in the rasa-lila."
        Lord Shiva, not to be outdone, submerges himself in Yamunadevi, non-different from love of Krishna, and emerges as a gopi. Now qualified as feminine, he gains an exclusive inside view into the Rasa play of Krishna and the gopis. The other Gods, including Brahma, may only witness and shower flowers from outside the realm of Vamsivata on Yamuna shore.
        The Deity of Gopishwar Mahadev, worshipped in a small temple near Vamsivata, is a lingam -- one of four important Shiva-linga shrines in Vraja. Each night the lingam is transformed as he assumes the semblance of a gopi's face, replete with nose ring and other feminine ornaments in a most colourful attire The ensemble is different every day of the year. Lord Shiva resides forever in Vrindavan as Gopishwara Mahadeva, the dearest devotee of Krishna, and thus participates in all the Lord's unending Lila. [Photos courtesy of Robyn Beech from the book on Sri Sri Radha Ramanji and Vrindavan Dham: Celebrating Krishna (Copyright Sri Chaitanya Prema Samasthana, Gambhira, Sri Radha-ramana. Vrindavan)]








      .

      Watermelon label, 1940s.
      Old 1920's Dancing Sambo novelty magic trick. It features a jointed "black sambo" figure 11.5 inches tall, described as "Dancing Sambo, Easy to work, Fun at your parties."


      Derogatory comics from 1911 were printed in various American Newspapers.






      Chef and Mammy Figures are found frequently at flea markets all across the United States.






      Sambo Board Game by Wyandotte, a major toy maker in the 1940s and 1950s.
      1940's Made in Japan Black Americana Ceramic Black Sambo Eye Glass holder.
      1940's Black Americana Chalkware Black Sambo ash tray, Black Sambo is eating a piece of watermelon.
      1949 Black Americana Chalkware Black Sambo hot pad holder.






















      Vaishnavanam Yatha Sambhu



      Shiva Ratri is always a well attended event and this year was no exception. I estimate 600 people came and went during the three hour festivities. There was an mix of 30 per cent Indians and 70 per cent Westerners. I noticed not only Western college age kids, but maybe ten per cent of the audience older grandparents age, many of whom stayed the whole time.



      This reproduction of a 1900 minstrel show poster, originally published by the Strobridge Litho Co., shows the blackface transformation from white to "black".

      The white actors who portrayed these characters spoke an ersatz, exaggerated form of Black Vernacular English. These characters were stupid and silly at best, grotesque and alien at worst. The blackface makeup and illustrations on programs and sheet music depicted them with huge eyeballs, overly wide noses, and thick-lipped mouths that hung open or grinned foolishly; one character expressed his love for a woman with "lips so large a lover could not kiss them all at once".[63] They had huge feet and preferred "possum" and "coon" to more civilized fare. Minstrel characters were often described in animalistic terms, with "wool" instead of hair, "bleating" like sheep, and having "darky cubs" instead of children. Other ludicrous claims were that blacks had to drink ink when they got sick "to restore their color" and that they had to file their hair rather than cut it. They were inherently musical, dancing and frolicking through the night with no need for sleep.





      Slave characters in general came to be low-comedy types with names that matched the instruments they played: Brudder Tambo (or simply Tambo) for the tambourine and Brudder Bones (or Bones) for the bone castanets or bones. These endmen (for their position in the minstrel semicircle) were ignorant and poorly spoken, being conned, electrocuted, or run over in various sketches. They happily shared their stupidity; one slave character said that to get to China, one had only to go up in a balloon and wait for the world to rotate below.

      Highly musical and unable to sit still, they constantly contorted their bodies wildly while singing.

      Tambo and Bones's simple-mindedness and lack of sophistication were highlighted by pairing them with a straight manmaster of ceremonies called the interlocutor. This character, although usually in blackface, spoke in aristocratic English and used a much larger vocabulary. The humor of these exchanges came from the misunderstandings on the part of the endmen when talking to the interlocutor:
      Interlocutor: I'm astonished at you, Why, the idea of a man of your mental calibre talking about such sordid matters, right after listening to such a beautiful song! Have you no sentiment left? Tambo: No, I haven't got a cent left. Tambo and Bones were favorites of the audience, and their repartee with the interlocutor was for many the best part of the show.

      There was an element of laughing with them for the audience, as they frequently made light of the interlocutor's grandiose ways.

      The interlocutor was responsible for beginning and ending each segment of the show.

      To this end, he had to be able to gauge the mood of the audience and know when it was time to move on.

      Accordingly, the actor who played the role was paid very well in comparison to other non-featured performers.




      ..."White minstrel shows featured white performers pretending to be blacks, playing their versions of black music and speaking ersatzblack dialects..."



      As a result, the genre played an important role in shaping perceptions of and prejudices about blacks generally and African Americans in particular.

      Some social commentators have stated that blackface provided an outlet for whites' fear of the unknown and the unfamiliar, and a socially acceptable way of expressing their feelings and fears about race and control. Writes Eric Lott in Love and Theft: Blackface Minstrelsy and the American Working Class, "The black mask offered a way to play with the collective fears of a degraded and threatening—and male—Other while at the same time maintaining some symbolic control over them."

      American humorist and author Mark Twain reminisced near the end of his life about the shows he had seen in his youth:
      ..."the real nigger-show—the genuine nigger-show, the extravagant nigger-show—the show which to me had no peer and whose peer has not yet arrived, in my experience.... if I could have the nigger-show back again, in its pristine purity and perfection, I should have but little further use for opera. It seems to me that to the elevated mind and the sensitive spirit the hand-organ and the nigger-show are a standard and a summit to whose rarefied altitude the other forms of musical art may not hope to reach."
      Sri Sri Radha Krishna Temple - Utah Krishnas

      NITAAI Yoga ( Nityaananda Gauraanga Hare Krishna Naama Bhakti Yoga ) Society


      Blackface - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
      Minstrel show - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia









      Peace be upon you


      Scarab Beetle

      (kheper)

      Appearance: The particular species of beetle represented in the numerous ancient Egyptian amulets and works of art was commonly the large sacred scarab (Scarabaeus sacer). This beetle was famous for his habit of rolling balls of dung along the ground and depositing them in its burrows. The female would lay her eggs in the ball of dung. When they hatched, the larvae would use the ball for food. When the dung was consumed the young beetles would emerge from the hole.

      Millions of amulets and stamp seals of stone or faience were fashioned in Egypt depicted the scarab beetle.

      Meaning: It seemed to the ancient Egyptians that the young scarab beetles emerged spontaneously from the burrow were they were born. Therefore they were worshipped as "Khepera", which means "he was came forth." This creative aspect of the scarab was associated with the creator god Atum.

      The ray-like antenna on the beetle's head and its practice of dung-rolling caused the beetle to also carry solar symbolism. The scarab-beetle god Khepera was believed to push the setting sun along the sky in the same manner as the bettle with his ball of dung. In many artifacts, the scarab is depicted pushing the sun along its course in the sky.

      During and following the New Kingdom, scarab amulets were often placed over the heart of the mummified deceased. These "heart scarabs" (such as the one pictured above) were meant to be weighed against the feather of truth during the final judgement. The amulets were often inscribed with a spell from the Book of the Dead which entreated the heart to, "do not stand as a witness against me."


      Sambo - Live Search Images

    2. #2
      Pragmatic's Avatar
      Pragmatic is offline Moderator

      Join Date
      Nov 2005
      Location
      San Diego
      Posts
      2,815
      Blog Entries
      13
      Thumbs Up/Down
      Received: 22/0
      Given: 9/0
      Rep Power
      297

      0 Not allowed! Not allowed!
      re:
      Black Religion and the Black Prophets of Asia Dr Eugene Adams Part 1



      Peace be upon you

    3. #3
      Pragmatic's Avatar
      Pragmatic is offline Moderator

      Join Date
      Nov 2005
      Location
      San Diego
      Posts
      2,815
      Blog Entries
      13
      Thumbs Up/Down
      Received: 22/0
      Given: 9/0
      Rep Power
      297

      Joyful encounter with the Jarawa of Asia


      0 Not allowed! Not allowed!




      Siddi of asia




      India's Sidis, a forgotten diaspora of Africans


      By W M J van KESSEL (email the author)

      Posted Sunday, September 14 2008 at 10:21

      When Farida al-Mubrik reported for work on the first day of her new job with the bank in Bhavnagar, in the Indian state of Gujarat, she was referred to the foreign exchange counter, having been mistaken for a tourist.

      It took some effort on her part to convince the staff that she was a new colleague reporting to work.
      When Juje Sidi goes to the market, he gets the same treatment with vendors asking him to pay in dollars.

      On a visit to the Taj Mahal, one of India’s top tourist attractions, the ticket clerk assumed he was a foreigner and charged him 750 rupees ($17.60), the rate for foreign tourists.

      Sidi protested saying he was entitled to the much lower rate for citizens. The ticket clerk laughed and asked how a “black” visitor with dreadlocks could possibly be an Indian. With the help of bystanders and his identity document, the clerk was finally convinced.
      Returning from an overseas tour, members of the Sidi Goma musical group met with suspicious looks at the immigration control desk of Delhi airport. The officers wondered how they get hold of Indian passports... Nigerian forgery, no doubt!

      The history of the Sidis of India goes back many centuries. Indians with African features are known as Sidis or Habshis. According to ethno-linguists, Habshi is derived from the word “Abyssinian.”

      The meaning of Sidi or Siddi is more controversial however. One view is that it simply means slave, while others argue that it is derived from a phrase meaning “master.”






      Peace be upon you

      Meaning of Siddihartha
      http://www.blurtit.com/q733047.html

      full post here:
      http://www.theeastafrican.co.ke/maga...z/-/index.html

    4. #4
      kobina re's Avatar
      kobina re is offline Warrior

      Join Date
      Jul 2010
      Location
      memphis
      Posts
      6
      Blog Entries
      19
      Thumbs Up/Down
      Received: 0/0
      Given: 0/0
      Rep Power
      0

    5. #5
      AfricanRoots's Avatar
      AfricanRoots is offline Warrior

      Join Date
      Jan 2012
      Location
      Earth
      Posts
      22
      Thumbs Up/Down
      Received: 1/0
      Given: 0/0
      Rep Power
      0

      0 Not allowed! Not allowed!
      I am going to fix the video for this post.

      Eugene Adams - Africans In Asia


    Thread Information

    Users Browsing this Thread

    There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

    Similar Threads

    1. Replies: 0
      Last Post: 09-07-2010, 01:45 PM
    2. Eugene Terreblanche A Hero?
      By yah'nineh in forum Tshwane, S.A.
      Replies: 1
      Last Post: 04-13-2010, 11:21 AM
    3. Black Asia
      By Queen_Samiya in forum Open Forum
      Replies: 0
      Last Post: 05-30-2008, 03:04 AM
    4. Texas Governor Commutes Death Sentence for Kenneth Eugene Foster
      By Jacuma in forum Our Prisoner's Of War (POW)
      Replies: 0
      Last Post: 08-30-2007, 08:12 PM
    5. Who Were The American Indians
      By GoodRain in forum The Contested Zone
      Replies: 16
      Last Post: 11-01-2005, 08:22 AM

    Thread Participants: 2

    Posting Permissions

    • You may not post new threads
    • You may not post replies
    • You may not post attachments
    • You may not edit your posts
    •  


    About

      Assata Shakur Speaks is an Forum Devoted To Assata Shakur And All Political Prisoners Around The World.
      Assata Shakur Speaks Is An Oasis Of Pan African Information Geared Towards The Liberation Of Afrikan People.

    Follow Us On

    Twitter Facebook youtube Flickr DavianArt Dribbble RSS Feed



    BACK TO TOP